To Eat a Triceratops, Tear It Apart

By Ashley P. Taylor | October 26, 2012 2:29 pm

dinosaur drawing

Paleontologists now think they know how the predatory Tyrannosaur ate the well-protected Triceratops: by ripping its head off.  The carnivore may have forcefully yanked on the bony frills around the neck of its horned prey in order to get to the rich meat beneath. The researchers, who reported their findings at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology’s annual meeting last week, suggested this scenario after examining Triceratops skulls, where they found puncture and pull marks on the neck frills—along with bite marks on the head-neck joint that could only have been made on a severed head.

For a fuller explanation, replete with step-by-step illustrations, visit Nature News.

Drawing courtesy of Nate Carroll via Nature

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World
ADVERTISEMENT
NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

80beats

80beats is DISCOVER's news aggregator, weaving together the choicest tidbits from the best articles covering the day's most compelling topics.
ADVERTISEMENT

See More

ADVERTISEMENT
Collapse bottom bar
+