Tag: Milky Way

Look at This: Colorful Birthplace of Galaxy’s Youngest Black Hole

By Breanna Draxler | February 14, 2013 10:18 am

This highly distorted supernova remnant may contain the most recent black hole formed in the Milky Way galaxy. The composite image combines X-rays from Chandra (blue and green), radio data from the Very Large Array (pink), and infrared data from the Palomar Observatory (yellow). Image courtesy of NASA.

This colorful supernova remnant is called W49B, and inside it astronomers think they may have found the Milky Way’s youngest black hole. It’s only 1,000 years old, as seen from Earth, and 26,000 lightyears away.

From a vantage point on NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers observed and measured the remnant and determined it to be very unique. The supernova explosion of this massive star was not symmetrical like most, and instead of collapsing to form a telltale neutron star at its center, this supernova seems to have a black hole.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space, Top Posts

Our Galaxy May Have 50 Billion Exoplanets–and It's Still Making More

By Andrew Moseman | February 25, 2011 1:27 pm


Young. Old. Scalding hot. Icy cold. Terrestrial midgets. Gas giants. As the cavalcade of planets spotted beyond our solar system continues to grow, we get to see worlds of all sorts—and we get to speculate on the staggering number of exoplanets that might inhabit just our own galaxy.

Today’s first piece of otherworldly news involves baby exoplanets. Astronomer Christian Thalmann says his team may have spotted planets in the process of forming around three different stars, the first time scientists have spotted the process in action.

An infant star forms from a collapsing cloud of dust and gas and gathers a dense, flat disk of material that rotates with the star like a record album. The material in the disk will eventually clump up into nascent planets. Theoretical models of planet formation predicted that those protoplanets should suck up more gas and dust with their gravity, clearing a wide gap in the otherwise solid disk. [Wired]

Peering at young stars like T Chamaeleontis (T Cha) LkCa15 and AB Auriga, Thalmann and colleagues saw those telltale gaps in the dusty rings (their study is forthcoming in the Astrophysical Journal Letters). The stars are much like our own sun, so these pictures of infant solar systems could resemble what our own looked like as a baby. But though the stars are nearby in cosmic terms—T Cha lies just 350 light years away—the gaps are faint enough that it’s difficult to tell for certain if newly forming planets, and not the influence of binary stars or other objects, are creating them.

If Thalmann’s team is right, catching the birth of new worlds would be a great scientific coup. Our galaxy, however, isn’t exactly hurting for planets.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

The Sight of Twisted Light Could Reveal a Spinning Black Hole

By Andrew Moseman | February 14, 2011 12:10 pm

No, you can’t see a black hole. What you might be able to see, though, is the way in which relativity predicts a spinning black hole will bend space, time, and light around it. Scientists say in a new study in Nature Physics that they are closer than ever to being able to see this effect in faraway black holes from our vantage point here on Earth.

Galaxies probably have spinning, supermassive black holes at their center, and spinning black holes possess two types of angular momentum, study coauthor Bo Thide explains. There’s spin angular momentum, which is analogous to what the Earth creates as it spins on its axis, and there’s orbital angular momentum, which is analogous to what the Earth creates as it orbits the sun. Thidé says that the second effect—orbital angular momentum—distorts light in a way that scientists who know what to look for might be able to see it from here.

“Around a spinning black hole, space and time behave in such an odd way; space becomes time, time becomes space, and the whole space-time is actually dragged around the black hole, becomes twisted around the black hole,” Professor Thidé explained. “If you have radiation source… it will then sense this twisting of spacetime itself. The light ray may think that ‘I’m propagating in a straight line’, but if you look at it from the outside, you see it’s propagating along a spiral line. That’s relativity for you.” [BBC News]

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Physics & Math, Space

Planck Telescope Searches the Super-Cold Universe, Finds Neat Stuff

By Eliza Strickland | January 13, 2011 12:08 pm

Sometimes, distractions can be useful in themselves. That’s the message this week from the Planck space telescope, which has a mighty big mission: to take baby pictures of the universe. While it hasn’t yet accomplished that task, the preliminary disturbances that Planck scientists are now dealing with are yielding cosmic insights of their own.

Orbiting the Sun roughly 1.5 million kilometres from Earth, the Planck space-based telescope is scanning the sky for ultra-cold objects. Its instruments are chilled to just a tenth of a degree above absolute zero and are designed to pick up the faint microwave afterglow from the Big Bang, which scientists hope can tell them about the earliest moments of the Universe. [Nature News]

Planck was launched in spring of 2009 by the European Space Agency, and it’s still gathering data to complete its chart of this cosmic microwave background (CMB); researchers hope the map will shed light on the young universe’s brief “inflationary” period when it expanded extremely rapidly. At the moment, however, Planck is busy detecting other sources of microwaves so that it can subtract this “foreground” radiation from its map of the background.

So what are some of these sources?

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Physics & Math, Space

Found: An Exoplanet From Another Galaxy

By Andrew Moseman | November 18, 2010 2:44 pm

ExtragalacticExoplanetA fascinating discovery from today’s edition of the journal Science: Astronomers from Germany report a new exoplanet with two startling characteristics. First, it closely orbits a star that has already exhausted its hydrogen supply and moved past the red giant stage, so this hot Jupiter has so far survived without being evaporated (despite its proximity—just 0.12 astronomical units).

But second, and most striking: This planet and star came from another galaxy.

From Phil Plait:

OK, first, this planet is in our own Milky Way galaxy. The star, called HIP 13044, is about 2000 light years away, well inside our galaxy. So how do we know it’s from a different galaxy? All the stars in our galaxy orbit the galactic center, like planets orbit around a star. But many years ago, astronomers noticed that many stars in the sky have the same sort of motion as they orbit, as if they all belong to streams of stars, flowing like water in a river. Many such streams exist, and eventually astronomers figured out that these were the leftover remnants of entire small galaxies that had collided with, been torn apart, and basically eaten by our Milky Way.

HIP 13044 is part of one of those streams, called the Helmi Stream. It’s the remains of a dwarf galaxy the Milky Way tore apart probably more than 6 billion years ago. So the star and its planet formed in an actual other galaxy, one that either orbited the Milky Way or had an unfortunately too-close pass to it. Either way, wow!

During a web conference this morning, study coauthor Rainer Klement said we shouldn’t be surprised the star and planet are still together even though our galaxy tore theirs apart. Galaxies are structures of stars, but the stars themselves are still so far away that even during a galactic breakup they don’t pass near enough to one another to gravitationally influence a planet. “The timescale upon which such stars play a role is larger than the age of the universe,” he said.

Read the rest of Phil’s post at Bad Astronomy.

Related Content:
80beats: Astronomers Predict a Bonanza of Earth-Sized Exoplanets
80beats: Um… That “Goldilocks” Exoplanet May Not Exist
Discoblog: So, How Long Would It Take to Travel to That Exciting New Exoplanet?
DISCOVER: How Long Until We Find a Second Earth?

Image: ESO

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

Found: Giant Gamma Ray Bubbles at the Heart of the Galaxy

By Andrew Moseman | November 10, 2010 5:40 pm

GammaraybubbleThose two purple lobes in the figure-eight shape are balloons of gamma ray energy that reach out 25,000 light years above and below the plane of the galaxy. Yet these huge structures have remained hidden from astronomers, until now.

Using NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, Doug Finkbeiner and colleagues detected the bubbles after they managed to remove from their images an obstructing “fog” of gamma rays between here and there.

Researchers do not yet know what produced the bubbles, but the fact that they appear to have relatively sharp edges suggests that they were produced in a single event. Finkbeiner said that would have required the rapid release of energy equivalent to about 100,000 supernovae, or exploding stars. One possibility is that there was a burst of star formation in the center of the galaxy producing massive, short-lived stars that exploded and ejected a great deal of gas and dust over a few million years. [Los Angeles Times]

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

Astronomers Predict a Bonanza of Earth-Sized Exoplanets

By Andrew Moseman | October 28, 2010 4:04 pm

keckThe universe abounds with Earth-sized planets. That hopeful notion has been reinforced by individual planets finds like possible Goldilocks planet Gliese 581g, by the hordes of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission, and now, by a census of a small space in the sky that tells us one in four sun-like stars should possess worlds that are close to the size of Earth.

Take a moment to think about that: One in four.

In Science, exoplanet hunters Geoffrey Marcy and Andrew Howard published their team’s census of 166 nearby stars like ours, of which they picked 22 at random to investigate for planets. They watched the stars’ doppler shifts to hunt for planets over the last five years, and used the results to extrapolate how common terrestrial planets must be far beyond just this set of stars.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space, Top Posts

The Runaway Star That's Racing Full-Throttle Out of Our Galaxy

By Andrew Moseman | July 23, 2010 1:13 pm

bluestarI like the Milky Way. I dare say it’s my favorite galaxy, being home and all. But a blue star called HE 0437-5439 is in one big hurry to leave.

The star is zooming away from the Milky Way’s center at 16 million miles per hour, three times faster than our own sun glides across the galaxy. Astronomers had spotted the hasty traveler before—it’s one of 16 known “hypervelocity” stars. Now, with the help of the Hubble Space Telescope, Warren Brown of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics traced the path of the star back to the event that allowed it to reach such great speed: a meeting with a black hole.

A hundred million years ago this star was one of three traveling together at a more sedate pace.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

After a Flawless Launch, Kepler Telescope Gets Ready for Planet Hunting

By Eliza Strickland | March 9, 2009 9:08 am

Kepler launchOn Friday night, a Delta 2 rocket blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center and roared into space carrying a satellite that will search the heavens for Earth-like planets. The craft, Kepler, named after the German astronomer Johannes Kepler, who discovered the planetary laws of motion, is to spend the next three and a half years in an orbit around the Sun, where it will count planets by looking for the tiny blips in starlight caused by planets eclipsing their suns [The New York Times].

The $600 million satellite will stare into a region of the Milky Way that’s thick with stars, in the direction of the constellations Cygnus and Lyra. While Kepler is expected to identify many new planets beyond our solar system, known as exoplanets, the real prize would be to find rocky planets in the “habitable zone” around a star, where conditions might be right for life as we know it. “The habitable zone is where we think water will be,” Bill Borucki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA Ames, says in a video on the space agency’s Kepler site. “If you can find liquid water on the surface we think we may very well find life there. So that zone is not too close to the star, because it’s too hot and water boils, and not too far away where the water is condensed…a planet covered with glaciers. It’s the Goldilocks zone–not too hot, not too cold, just right for life” [CNET].

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

New Telescope Could Reveal a Milky Way Packed With Habitable Planets

By Eliza Strickland | February 26, 2009 5:13 pm

exoplanet earth-likeWhile astronomers have found more than 300 planets beyond our solar system in the last 15 years, none of those “exoplanets” has been a likely candidate for extraterrestrial life. The exoplanets discovered thus far are all either too close to the hot sun or too far away and therefore too frigid to host life as we know it. But Alan Boss says it’s just a matter of time before we find Earth-like planets in the “Goldilocks zone”: he calculates that 100 billion of them may exist within our own Milky Way galaxy. And NASA’s Kepler satellite, which is expected to launch on March 5, may be the key to finding them, he says.

Boss, an astrophysicist and author of the new book “The Crowded Universe: The Search for Living Planets,” says that if any of the billions of Earth-like worlds he believes exist in the Milky Way have liquid water, they are likely to be home to some type of life. “Now that’s not saying that they’re all going to be crawling with intelligent human beings or even dinosaurs,” he said. “But I would suspect that the great majority of them at least will have some sort of primitive life, like bacteria or some of the multicellular creatures that populated our Earth for the first 3 billion years of its existence” [CNN].

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space
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