Tag: brown dwarf

Cooler-Than-Steam Brown Dwarf Blurs The Line Between Star & Planet

By Patrick Morgan | March 10, 2011 6:20 pm

Planetar. Substar. Failed star. Sub-stellar object. Astronomers have pinned each of these monikers on brown dwarfs, a category that has always perplexed scientists because it raises questions about what it means to be a star or a planet. And if that wasn’t enough, now they’ve discovered the coldest brown dwarf yet, blurring the line between planet and star even further.

It’s name is CFBDSIR J1458+1013B, and may be cooler than the boiling point of water (at the pressure of Earth’s atmosphere). This strange body is about 75 light-years from us, where it orbits its binary partner, another brown dwarf. Using the infrared capabilities of the 10-meter Keck II Telescope on Mauna Kea, University of Hawaii researcher Michael Liu and his team estimated the brown dwarf’s temperature, and have a ballpark range for its mass: between 6 and 15 times the mass of Jupiter.

It’s special because it may be a class Y dwarf (temperature less than 225 degrees Celsius (440 F)), a type of object whose existence astronomers had predicted but never actually found. Before this candidate arose, the coolest known brown dwarf was in the T spectral class; while there have been a few Y-class candidates in the past, scientists have a better grasp on the temperature of this one: 97 degrees Celsius, plus or minus 40C.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space
MORE ABOUT: brown dwarf, planets, stars

Found: Jupiter-sized Brown Dwarf, Hiding in a Tight Orbit Around a Young Sun

By Joseph Calamia | July 30, 2010 12:07 pm

comparisonsizeImagine an infantile version of our 4.6 billion-year-old sun. Now picture a “failed star,” a brown dwarf, about the size of Jupiter, tightly orbiting that 12 million year old stellar baby–at the distance Uranus orbits our sun. Astronomers have just found such a duo: a  star about the mass of our sun with an unusually close brown dwarf companion.

Of the similarly situated brown dwarfs that astronomers have imaged, most keep their distance, orbiting at about 50 AU (or 50 times the average distance from the Earth to the sun). A team of astronomers believe the distance between this young sun, called PZ Tel A, and its dwarf companion, PZ Tel B, is less than half that, a mere 18 AU.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

A Hidden Cosmic Neighbor: Cool Brown Dwarf Found Lurking Near Our Solar System

By Andrew Moseman | April 12, 2010 10:59 am

Brown dwarfAstronomers have discovered the closest new star to us that’s been spotted in 63 years. Though “star” might be a stretch, depending upon whom you ask.

The new find, UGPS 0722-05, is less than 10 light years from here. But sky-watchers missed it for so long because it’s a brown dwarf, a member of the murky class of celestial objects that linger between gas giant planets and low-mass stars. Brown dwarfs have so little mass that they never get hot enough to sustain the nuclear fusion reactions that power stars like the sun. Still, they do shine, because they glow from the heat of their formation, then cool and fade [New Scientist]. This dwarf’s temperature is somewhere between 266 and 446 degrees Fahrenheit, making it the coldest scientists have even seen. With its minimal activity, the brown dwarf gives off just 0.000026 percent the amount of light that our sun does.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space
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