Tag: crickets

Audio: Ancient Katydid Sings From Beyond the Grave

By Veronique Greenwood | February 7, 2012 12:46 pm

spacing is important
Above, the fossilized teeth running along the katydid’s left and right wings
that researchers used to reconstruct the creature’s call.

Well-preserved fossils can tell paleontologists myriad things, such as what color feathers dinosaurs had, how ancient spiders evolved, and what kind of microbes were around 3 billion years ago. The latest such revelation is rather whimsical, as well as being scientifically interesting. Scientists have been able to reconstruct the chirping of a Jurassic ancestor of modern katydids by examining the wings of an exquisitely preserved fossil specimen.

Katydids create their song by scraping one wing across the other, running a hard ridge of tiny teeth, like those on a comb, across the ridge on the opposite wing. The research team examined the size and shape of the teeth on the wings of Archaboilus musicus, as the Jurassic specimen is called, to come up with an estimate of the frequency of the sound that such scraping would have produced. They found that the resulting chirping would have fallen at 6.4 kilohertz, within the range of normal human hearing.

So, if you ever get the chance to travel back 165 million years, keep your ears pricked. You might hear something that sounds like this:

Image and video courtesy of Gu et al, PNAS

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World

How Do Females Keep Sperm Fresh for Years?

By Veronique Greenwood | January 31, 2012 11:04 am

cricketThe researchers chose to examine the sperm of crickets, because, as with humans, you can get samples of it without having the male come into contact with a female first.

What’s the News: You might already know that sperm, which can survive for only a few hours when exposed to the outside world, can live for several days in women after ejaculation.  But did you know that an ant queen can fertilize her eggs with sperm she’s stored for up to 30 years? And that organisms as diverse as birds, reptiles, and insects can hang onto sperm and keep it fresh for days, weeks, or months?

Scientists studying this ability have been trying to figure out how females do it, and in a recent paper, researchers put forth evidence showing that the ladies may be arresting the aging process, by slowing down sperms’ metabolism.

Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World, Top Posts
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