Tag: flood

Watch This: By Acting as a Plug, This Giant Water Balloon May Keep Subways Dry

By Breanna Draxler | November 20, 2012 11:26 am

Subway flooding was responsible for millions in damage during Hurricane Sandy, but an emerging technology may be able to prevent such soggy situations in the future.

This 32-by-16-foot balloon, featured in the NYTimes recently, can be filled with air or water to seal off a tunnel. The prototype of the inflatable plug has an outer webbing of liquid-crystal polymer fiber; the inside layer uses the same fiber and is reinforced with polyurethane to create a better seal. Researchers say the technology is still a year or two from release. The plug holds promise for preventing future flooding, but at $400,000 a pop, they would be a pretty pricey preventative measure.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Technology

Just Your Average Infestation: Despite Fears, No More NYC Street Rats Than Normal Since Sandy

By Ashley P. Taylor | November 1, 2012 10:53 am

subway rats

Ratpocolypse, flood of rats, the ra(p)ture…Ever since Hurricane Sandy flooded New York City’s subway systems, reporters have been waxing biblical as they wonder: what happened to all the rodents who once scampered and snacked in New York City’s tunnels? People aren’t sure how many rats there were to begin with—28 to 32 million, perhaps—but though many may have died in the storm, people expected to see swarms of them appearing on the street after the storm, feasting on tasty, soggy storm debris. So far, New Yorkers seem to have been spared that sight.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Environment, Living World

One Gene That Allows Rice to Stand Up to Both Floods & Droughts

By Patrick Morgan | March 7, 2011 1:50 pm

Brown rice. White rice. Sushi. Rice pudding. Rice in all its wonderful forms is the main food source of over three billion people, which makes this statistic all the more ominous: Right now, droughts and floods threaten over 25% of Earth’s rice harvests. But that doesn’t faze one group of scientists who have discovered that rice evolved to to resist floods also resist droughts.

The gene Sub1A, which is found in a few strains of rice, is responsible for this dual flood-drought protection. The researchers who discovered it in 1996 feared that a gene that protects a plant against flooding might make it especially sensitive to drought. So UC–Riverside researcher Julia Bailey-Serres and her colleagues were all the more surprised that the Sub1A gene actually makes rice better at coping with water shortage. This welcome trait became apparent after the water-starved plants grew fresh shoots after the researchers subjected the plants to a mock drought in the lab.

So how does a single gene work against both floods and droughts? The gene triggers a stressed plant to go dormant (whether that stress is an overabundance or lack of water) until the environment recovers from that stress. This may seem like an ability of limited use out in the world, but it’s actually important for some plants. After water levels go down at the end of a flood, a rice plant that had grown accustomed to soaking in water becomes dehydrated, as if it were suffering through a drought. As strange as it sounds, drought is a natural process in the flooding cycle, and it’s this fact that tricks the Sub1A gene into allowing rice plants to become dormant during both floods and droughts, conserving energy for up to two weeks, before reawakening after the waters recede or rain finally returns.

This gene for flood tolerance only naturally occurs in certain low-yielding rices in India and Sri Lanka, but scientists have already genetically engineered some high-yielding rice to exhibit this trait—which means that some farmers have also unknowingly been protecting their crops from droughts as well.

Related Content:
DISCOVER: #49: Plant Migration Tied to Climate Change
80beats: Worsening Drought Threatens Australia’s “Food Bowl”
80beats: Global Warming May Make Half the World Hungry by 2100
80beats: More Floods, Droughts, and Hurricanes Predicted for a Warmer World

Image: flickr / matsuyuki

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Environment
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