Tag: HIV vaccine

Instead of an HIV Vaccine, What About HIV Gene Therapy?

By Veronique Greenwood | December 1, 2011 4:28 pm

hiv

Vaccines usually work by getting the body to make antibodies against a virus, so when the virus appears on the scene, the immune system is prepared to tag it for destruction. But getting the body excited about making such antibodies isn’t always easy. It’s this stumbling block that has made HIV vaccines so disappointing so far, and in response, some scientists have reached for the big guns of biology. In a paper published today in Nature, one team reports that they’ve been able to make mice immune to HIV using, of all things, gene therapy.

Best known as a process for replacing faulty genes with fresh ones to treat chronic diseases, gene therapy seems, at first glance, like overkill. It involves engineering a lab-grown virus to permanently insert a gene into a patient’s genome, and it can be dicey, to say the least. Despite two decades of research, no gene therapy treatments have made it out of clinical trials. But given the difficulty of getting the immune system to buckle down and make antibodies against HIV on its own, using gene therapy starts to make a kind of sense. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Health & Medicine, Top Posts
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