Tag: pesticide

Yes, Insecticides Kill Bees. Studies ID Chemical That May Contribute to Colony Collapse

By Sarah Zhang | March 29, 2012 2:54 pm

spacing is important
Honey bees tagged with RFID chips

The mysterious drop in honey bee populations—often called colony collapse disorder for lack of a more specific name—has generated a long list of suspects that includes mites, viruses, malnutrition, and even cell phone radiation. Two new studies published in Science suggest that neonicotinoids, a class of widely used insecticides, may belong at the top of the list.

That an insecticide kills insects like bees is not particularly surprising. Neonicotoinoids have already been partially banned in Italy, Germany, and France for their possible role in colony collapse disorder. Still, it remains one of the most common pesticides: one neonicotoinid alone, imidacloprid, is authorized for use on over 140 crops in 120 countries. Results from the two new studies suggest that even doses that do not kill the bee immediately can have enough ill effect to eventually cause colony collapse.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Environment, Living World

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