Tag: vietnam

Blood in Leeches Alerts Scientists to the Presence of Hard-to-Spot Endangered Animals

By Veronique Greenwood | April 24, 2012 12:21 pm

leeches
The scientists’ blood-sucking accomplices

What’s the News: Scientists searching for new and endangered species in tropical highlands face a Catch 22. Spotting shy creatures is the order of the day, but bushwhacking through forests is anything but subtle. How can you get a sense of what’s there when you can’t get close enough to see it?

Environmental DNA analysis is one of the answers—checking out the DNA in soil, for instance, can reveal what pooped there recently in amazing detail. But for a technique that can reach beyond a given patch of ground, scientists have been investigating using leeches from streamwater as their source of DNA. It turns out that blood from their last meal sticks around in their gut for a good long time, and they happen to be partial to human blood too—which makes them, in the scientists’ words, “easy to collect.” A new paper gives proof that the technique is valuable: blood in leeches collected from a Vietnamese rainforest reveals the presence of six mammalian species, some of them rare.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World, Top Posts

Bat's Very Strange-Looking Nose May Be Used For Echolocation

By Sarah Zhang | February 27, 2012 1:01 pm

spacing is important
Whatcha looking at? This is just my face.

This new leaf-nosed bat species was recently discovered in Vietnam. What’s with the strange nose? Scientists think that its protuberances and indentations help the bat in echolocation. Come to think of it, it does kind of resemble another excellent sound detector: the inside a cat’s ear.

As strange as the Hipposideros griffini’s nose is, it’s really got nothing on the star-nosed mole.

[via National Geographic News]

Image courtesy of Vu Dinh Thong / Journal of Mammalogy 

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World

Google Exposes a Cyber Attack on Vietnamese Activists

By Smriti Rao | March 31, 2010 11:24 am

computer-virusIs the Vietnamese government following China’s example, and muffling online dissent to pursue its own political ends? Internet giant Google seems to think so. Writing on the company’s online security blog, Neel Mehta of Google’s security team has revealed that tens of thousands of Vietnamese computers were subject to a potent virus attack this week–and that the attack targeted activists who are opposed to a Chinese mining project in Vietnam.

Google writes that the activists mistakenly downloaded malicious software that infected their computers. The infected machines could be used to spy on the users, and were also used to attack Web sites and blogs that voiced opposition to the mining project. This cyber attack, Google says, was an attempt to “squelch” opposition to bauxite mining in Vietnam, a highly controversial issue in the country. The computer security firm, McAfee Inc, which detected the malware, went a step further, saying its creators “may have some allegiance to the government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.” The Vietnamese Foreign Ministry had no immediate comment [Moneycontrol].

Google’s current spat with China began with a similar accusation, when the company accused Beijing of hacking into and spying on Chinese activists’ gmail accounts. Just this week, journalists in China said their email accounts were compromised because of yet another spyware attack.

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: Environment, Technology
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