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ImaGeo

As the Trump administration proposes to gut climate change funding, the climate continues to change

By Tom Yulsman | March 21, 2017 1:46 pm

Last month brought scant relief from global warming, and there’s a chance that 2017 could turn out to be the warmest year on record

Even though the warming influence of El Niño is long gone, and 2017 was expected to offer some relief from record temperatures set last year, February saw very little letup in global warming.

And now there’s at least a chance that 2017 as a whole could be headed for the record books.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration is moving aggressively to halt  …

The Crux

Soaking in a Hot Bath Yields Benefits Similar to Exercise

By Steve Faulkner, Loughborough University | March 21, 2017 11:17 am

Many cultures swear by the benefits of a hot bath. But only recently has science began to understand how passive heating (as opposed to getting hot and sweaty from exercise) improves health.

At Loughborough University we investigated the effect of a hot bath on blood sugar control (an important measure of metabolic fitness) and on energy expended (number of calories burned). We recruited 14 men to take part in the study. They were assigned to an hour-long soak in a hot bath (40˚C) or an …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Health & Medicine, Top Posts
MORE ABOUT: personal health

The Extremo Files

Could Life's Earliest Stages Have Survived Without a Key Ingredient?

By Jeffrey Marlow | March 21, 2017 5:25 am

“CHNOPS” is one of science’s most revered acronyms, an amalgamation of letters that rolls of the tongues of high school biology students and practicing researchers alike. It accounts for the six elements that comprise most biological molecules: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur.

Biologists have traditionally assumed that all six elements were prerequisites, as each one is found in several of life’s most essential molecules. But what if earlier life forms  …

D-brief

You Can Become a Memory Champion, Too

By Ian Graber-Stiehl | March 20, 2017 3:23 pm

Need to memorize a series of numbers? Try this: Imagine yourself walking through a house while locking visualizations of a “12” or “78” into different rooms and cabinets located throughout the house.

You’ve just used the “method of loci,” which is a fundamental memorization technique that dates back to ancient Greece and is employed by champion memory athletes. Radboud University Medical Center neuroscientist Martin Dresler, lead author of a study recently published in the j …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, top posts
MORE ABOUT: memory & learning

Seriously, Science?

Think getting your alcohol through an IV will prevent a hangover? Think again.

By Seriously Science | March 20, 2017 6:00 am

We’ve heard of “eyeballing,” and even trying to get drunk by soaking your feet in vodka, but this is the first we’ve heard of getting drunk by IV. Thank goodness it’s not for recreational purposes! These researchers wanted to know whether “drinking” alcohol through an IV — a practice used for understanding the physiological response to alcohol — would give similar hangovers as drinking the old-fashioned way. Turns out, it does. There goes our plan for Saturday night :(

Characterizati …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: ethanol, told you so

Neuroskeptic

Unethical "Stem Cell" Therapy for Autism In India?

By Neuroskeptic | March 17, 2017 4:29 pm

I just read a concerning paper about an experimental stem cell treatment for children with autism.

The authors are Himanshu Bansal and colleagues of India. The senior author, Prasad S Koka, is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Stem Cells where the paper appeared, which raises questions about whether the manuscript received a thorough peer review. Koka is actually an author on all five of the research papers published in that issue of the journal. But that’s a minor issue compared  …

Seriously, Science?

Flashback Friday: Drinking alcohol actually makes your face more attractive.

By Seriously Science | March 17, 2017 6:00 am

As we’ve previously reported, beer goggles are a real phenomenon. Well, according to this study, drinking doesn’t just make other people more attractive–it also makes you more attractive. Here, researchers asked (sober) participants to look at photos of people who had been drinking and rank their attractiveness. Turns out that drinking a moderate amount (equivalent to two small glasses of wine) made people more attractive, whereas doubling that amount made them less attractive. The autho …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Uncategorized

D-brief

Weapons Physicist Posts Declassified Nuclear Test Videos to YouTube

By Nathaniel Scharping | March 16, 2017 2:44 pm

A trove of footage from early U.S. nuclear weapons tests has just been declassified and uploaded to YouTube.

The film release was part of a project headed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapons physicist Greg Spriggs which aimed to digitize and preserve thousands of films documenting the nation’s nuclear history. The endeavor required an all-hands-on deck approach from archivists, film experts and software engineers, but the team says that this digitized database is a …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space & Physics, Technology, top posts

Dead Things

Earth's Original Crust Still Hanging Around

By Gemma Tarlach | March 16, 2017 1:00 pm

Researchers who want to study the nature of Earth’s original crust find themselves between a rock and a hard place: Our planet’s top layer is constantly wearing down in one spot and building up in another, continents colliding or slip-sliding past each other in the great mosh pit of plate tectonics. You might have figured none of the early crust was even still around. New research shows you would have figured wrong.

Today in Science, researchers announced they’d found bits of Earth’s orig …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World, top posts
MORE ABOUT: Canada, geology

D-brief

We Deserve At Least Half the Blame for Declining Arctic Sea Ice

By Nathaniel Scharping | March 16, 2017 7:00 am

Natural variability in atmospheric conditions could account for as much as half of the recent decline in Arctic sea ice, according to a new study.

While the masses of ice that float atop the planet have been in steady decline over the past few decades, scientists haven’t been able to say how much of the losses are attributable to human-driven climate change and how much is simply the result of periodic swings in climate conditions. While the scientific consensus is that human activities  …

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Environment, top posts
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