Introducing the Bad Astronomy Blog

By Phil Plait | March 13, 2005 6:33 pm

So, it’s come to this.

Perhaps it’s been too long coming. If you’ve read the site, you know I have a lot to say, maybe too much. There’s a boatload of astronomy out there, Bad and Good, and not enough time to write up whole pages about it. Plus, sometimes I just think of stuff (the bane of the thinker), and I might want to make a short, pithy comment for the Curious Masses out there.

So here you go. The BABlog. I may have a contest later on how to pronounce that. In my head, it kinda comes out “blah blog”. Anyway, it was either this or do a podcast, and a podcasting friend of mine told me how much effort a ‘cast would be. So now I’m blogging, because I’m nothing if not least effort.

The next entry will have actual content. I promise. Until then, welcome, and take an hour or two to poke around the main Bad Astronomy site.

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Comments (12)

  1. Michelle Rochon

    Huzzah! The Bad Astronomer will now post more regularly! My dream come true! I was starting to miss your writing, sir!

  2. To me it reads: “Bah-Blog”, kinda like “Ka-Boom”.

    Which is a Good Thing.

  3. Peter Thomassen

    do you need someone to translater your book to greenlandic
    I have not read it yet because I do not have it but I have download pdf from your homepage I belive that no one have ever been in moon so I really like to let everyone know that nobody have not ever been in moon

  4. Russ

    “..people simply are not familiar with the sky.”
    From “It’s a bird it’s a plane…” I had to laugh. I was on vacation in the Wisconsin Dells. We, my sister and people from the other cabain when, one of the women from the other cabin aksed “what is that bright object in the sky”. We all looked out into the west and say a bright object. I said it’s either Venus or Jupiter, I was not sure. No one listened and kept asking ‘ is a plane or what ?” Agian I said it’s Venus. No one wanted to listen. People will beleive what they want to believe.

  5. Roger

    Regarding the halos around the sun, you’re wrong it meant that a particular and rare set of environmental and geophysical events came together to create a very real effect. So it meant something quite real, that the universe is a pretty tripped out place, where fantastic things can and do happen all the time.

    The evidence is all around us.

  6. Paul

    Podcast… please do a podcast. It’s not that difficult… honest it’s not.

  7. Welcome to the blogosphere, Phil. You’re a welcome addition to my blogroll.

  8. As a truth seeker, I was initially refreshed by the critical thinking I encountered on this web site. Unfortunately, it is critical of the truth. According to an article on your web site located at http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/mccanney/snowballs.html, Jim McCanney couldn’t possibly be correct about comets not being balls of ice, because you can measure the temperature with a spectroscope. This URL of yours claims that you can use this device to read the temperature of an object in space depending on it’s COLOR in the light spectrum. Anyone who has taken a chemistry class knows that the color of light from a is a direct response from the burning of a specific chemical on the periodic table of elements. Each chemical gives off a unique color in spectrum of light that can be seen when that element is burned, regardless of the temperature. This article of yours is blatant disinfo, and I am left wondering why you would slander McCanney with lies. Honestly, I already know why, and hopefully anyone who reads this will too. Here’s a clue: it has to do with Nikola Tesla.

  9. Thaiboxerken

    You obviously didn’t read the entire article. A space probe actually landed on a comet and found water!!

  10. IVAN3MAN AT LARGE

    Eric Johnson:

    This URL of yours claims that you can use this device to read the temperature of an object in space depending on it’s COLOR in the light spectrum. Anyone who has taken a chemistry class knows that the color of light from a is a direct response from the burning of a specific chemical on the periodic table of elements. Each chemical gives off a unique color in spectrum of light that can be seen when that element is burned, regardless of the temperature.

    Obviously, Eric Johnson has not taken a physics class: Black-body radiation.

  11. Mike

    Greetings! I am from the future and predict that on June 24th, 2010 at 1:42 pm you will post your 5000th entry. Please notify Randi that I wish to collect his $1 million in small, unmarked bills.

  12. Chris

    I am from the even more distant future and predict that on Sept. 21, 2012 at 9:32 AM you will post your 7000th entry! ūüėÄ

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