Moon Hoax originator has died

By Phil Plait | June 27, 2005 9:15 pm

Note added July 9, 2005: This article is featured in the 12th Skeptics Circle. This time, the Circle has a decidedly western feel. Take a look.

It’s been announced that Bill Kaysing has died.

He’s the man most people credit (if that’s the word) as the original person to claim the Apollo Moon landings were faked. I’ll admit, his death leaves me with mixed feelings. I’m saddened that he has died, but I must be honest and say he was a monumental antiscientist, responsible in many ways for one of the most colossal wastes of time and effort in my memory.

A Google search on the terms “moon hoax” yields a quarter million hits; “apollo fake” a hundred thousand more. How much energy, how much brain power, how much simple time has been wasted on this ridiculous claim? Even today, four years after that atrocious Fox “documentary” loaded with fallacious claims about NASA faking the Moon landings, my Moon Hoax page still is the most popular static page on my site, getting almost a half million readers per year. I get mail almost daily about this as well. A lot of people chew on the gristle of the arguments, and without the proper evidence– evidence, I’ll be blunt, Kaysing never gave them — they may walk away convinced the landings were faked.

Kaysing virtually spawned an industry of deception. Bart Sibrel, Ralph Rene, David Percy, and literally dozens of others have made money off of deceiving the public through the withholding of evidence, using deceptive descriptions, and in some cases telling outright lies. I have dealt with all of these men in various circumstances, and have found them to be all-too willing to stoop as low as possible to convince people of their arguments.

To be fair, some may actually believe what they say. Kaysing may have. But he was still wrong, and made claims that are sickening (NASA killed the Apollo 1 astronauts to keep them quiet; NASA blew up Challenger on purpose to keep the astronauts quiet about the “fact” that space travel is impossible, and much more). And he was disingenuous: in the Fox TV show, he was quoted as saying that if NASA pointed Hubble at the Moon landings, it would show clear evidence if they were real, and further said that if he saw those pictures he would stop making his claims. First, Hubble cannot see objects that small on the Moon. Second, NASA returned literally thousands of images from the astronauts themselves! Why would he believe a few more from Hubble?

As I said, I’m saddened by his death, but I am far more saddened that thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of school children might buy into this outrageous bill of goods. I have heard many stories of kids talking to their teachers about the missions being faked, and more galling, of teachers telling their school children that Apollo wasn’t real! I worry about the erosive affect this has on young minds, teaching them to ignore evidence and to simply believe what they are told– the very antithesis of what science is.

All this, from Bill Kaysing.

Yet, I hold out some hope. First, of course, for as much garbage as exists on the web, there are some pages that fight it. My efforts are just one example among many others who have picked up this gauntlet thrown down by antiscientists (I maintain a list of webpages on both sides of this issue).

And maybe there is even a glimmer of gold amongst all this offal. Years ago, when I was researching this topic for my book, I was getting pretty upset by it. I mean really upset, angry that people could make these appalling claims. I was having trouble sleeping at night, and my stomach was upset. One day, while looking at one image Kaysing said showed evidence of stage lighting, I was struck by the lighting, the contrast, the simple fact that here I was, looking at a picture of a man standing on the surface of the Moon. He had traveled a quarter of a million miles, risking his life, and there he was, feet planted on another world, holding up a sample of lunar dust for the whole world– his home world– to see.

I was overwhelmed with a sense of awe, a sense of pride, a warmth, and a satisfaction knowing that what I was doing was the right thing. It was the last time I lost sleep over the Moon Hoax.

Without Bill Kaysing, it must be said, I never would have experienced that. And I never would have regained my fascination for the Apollo missions and for the Moon itself; two aspects of my life I enjoy with great love now. Who knows how many others have been similarly affected?

So, to Bill Kaysing: you did a lot of terrible damage to the world. But you maybe, just maybe, did a little bit of good in the process, too.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Antiscience
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Comments (66)

  1. The Hubble comment begs the question, what is the resolution limit of the Hubble? The next step would be to take the 400,000 or so kilometers, do a little trig using the lunar lander base sa the size of the object and figure just how close the HST gets to being able to resolve human artifacts on the moon.

    Shall I leave that as an exercise for the reader?

    jbs

  2. M.A.DeLuca

    Just for spite, I’m not going to believe this.

    He died in *March* and we’re only hearing about it now? I’ll bet photograps of his corpse have anomolous shadows and other irregularities.

  3. Maksutov

    Not even close. The Hubble/Apollo landing site question has been discussed in great detail in a number of threads on the Bad Astronomy Bulletin Board. [url=http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=439347#439347]Here’s an example of one thread that gets into some math re resolution and pixels versus the size and distance of the Apollo lunar remnants.[/url]

  4. I’d like to gently remind people that despite whatever damage he did, a man has died. He’s accountable for his actions, certainly, which is why I posted the way I did, but I’d prefer we not dance over his body here.

  5. davery

    Bad Astronomer,

    I visit your site nearly everyday, hoping for updates or blog entries. While I don’t think I’m sorry about the death Bill Kaysing (I never knew him, or really even of him), I thought your entry was very thought provoking. I have little patience with the rampant anti-science that has proliferated in our country, but your take on Mr. Kaysing’s death, and how you comment on the positive that you got from his particular brand of “lunacy,” was touching. I wish more people could be as graceful as you were here.

    Thanks for the site.

  6. Kebsis

    It’s safe to say that, if I had never seen the FOX Apollo Hoax special when I was in high school, I would not have the interest in or appretiation of astronomy-real astronomy- that I do now. So you may be on to something.

  7. Bob Allee

    You’re very gracious in your comments about Mr. Kaysing. I too have learned not to let my emotions become negative, especially when defending something I love like the moon landings.
    The worst I can say of the man is that he is wrong and profited by it.
    But I learned so much more from probing deeper into the moon hoax comments that I am grateful for the incredible amount I learned on the greatest science and engineering achievement ever.
    For that, thank you Mr. Kaysing. As for the rest… Oh well.

  8. Jarvis

    I appreciate your sensitivity regarding the man’s death, despite your admittedly incompatible professional motivations. Had it not been for the Fox moon hoax show, I probably would never have come across your book or website.

    Mr. Kaysing’s impact on the public attitude towards space travel is undeniable. I work at the Clark Planetarium in Salt Lake City and almost daily I encounter someone curious about the things presented to them by the Fox show. To their credit, our patrons are mostly willing to accept the proper explanations for the “evidence” presented by the show. Thank you for providing the public with such a good resource for promoting good astronomy. Every moon hoax discussion includes a referral to your website.

    For a brief example, this was an actual exchange I had while demonstrating one of our telescopes by looking at the moon. After taking a look, a man asked me if this telescope could show the Apollo landers on the moon’s surface. After explaining to him about their incredibly tiny angular size at such great distance, he simply smirked and said “Or they’re just not there, what about that?”

    If it’s any consolation, I’ve had the opportunity to talk to many schoolteachers about the moon hoax. Many had students who would fire off things from hoax-promoting websites and they came to the planetarium for explanations. I’ve had similar experiences involving teachers asking about astrology. While it’s unsettling that a professional educator would teach their students that Apollo was fake, there are overwhelmingly more out there who care enough about their profession to become well-informed on science and astronomy topics.

    All the best,
    -Jarvis

    P.S.

    Out of personal curiosity, what was the stage lighting claim made about the picture posted above?

  9. Ian B

    No doubt Bill would smile in his grave if a conspiracy theory started about his demise. May he rest in peace.

    Would be interesting to see how his nephew (co-writer of the biography) reconciles his Uncle’s life story with his own previous working life at JPL and the Deep Space Network !

    A thought on explaining the “can we see the landers on the moon” discussion.

    Most people have flown on commercial aircraft and looked out the windows. They know that from 11 kilometres up you cannot see any man-made structures and quickly start choosing aisle seats. :-)

    Many of these same people own cameras (still or video) and realise that 16x zoom is quite powerful and makes things appear very big !

    Now after getting them to agree on that, explain the moon is over 36 thousand times as far away as the plane is from the ground ! If they can’t see a house from a plane, they wouldn’t be able to see a house on the Moon even with a telescope that has 36,000 x magnification.

    Cheers,
    Ian

  10. Jarvis– in the original picture (click on the picture to see it) you can see some odd shapes in the upper left corner. Kaysing said they were scaffolding and a krieg light. It’s actually just internal reflections of sunlight inside the camera. If you boost the contrast in the image you can also see a five-sided glow– it’s caused by the five-sided diaphragm in the camera. I make the joke in public talks that this is clear evidence the Pentagon was involved in the coverup. :-)

  11. Tim B (UK)

    I too concur that my personal interest in Apollo was rekindled by my quest to understand the hoax claims and very real satisfaction that has come from investigating the issues and appreciating just what apollo acheived.

    Now I am a real Apollo evangelist and bore my friends and kids with the small details that prove the hoax claims false and shine a light on some of the fantasic yet little known facts that made apollo such a success.

    So, I guess I’ve to thank the late Bill in a perverse way, since to appreciate the good in things, you have to know the bad too.

    Meeting Buzz Aldrin here in the UK last week was a lifetime thrill for me, but 2 kids in the queue who got a scholl project signed by Buzz, will hopefully carry the torch way after Bill and I are forgotten.

  12. Ray Martinson (Canada)

    I’ll take a plunge and dance on a corpse. Some have said above that a man has died and we should be sad. A man? Let us stand Bill Kaysing’s ‘achievements’ beside those of George Mueller, Chris Kraft, Rocco Petrone, Werner von Braun, Gene Kranzt, Deke Slayton, Alan Shepard, Ed White, Frank Borman, Neil Armstrong, Jim Lovell, and the rest of the four hundred thousand men and women who worked on the Apollo project. Can Kaysing really be called a ‘man’ in comparison with these giants. Not just a skeptic but one who was passionate about his conclusions, an anti-scientist gleefully producing ‘anti-knowledge’ in an effort to convince future generations that not only is man incapable of such an achievment as the moon landings, but that man in incapable and unworthy of aspiring to such achievment.

    Men built the Parthenon and the Roman aqueducts. Men sculpted the David and composed ‘Macbeth’. Men tamed electricity, gravity, harnessed the power of the atom. Men went to the moon and many more worked to make that a reality. Bill Kaysing did none of these things. In fact he worked hard to do the opposite, to destroy. To destroy truth, to subvert knowledge, the exact opposite to a process of true human achievment.

    I’ll dance on the corpse. Ask the band to play a nice fast one. The guy was slime. Good riddance.

  13. Amazing, only a couple weeks after we just had you on the show and talked about him.

    Maybe we can start an urban legend, talking about hoaxsters on Skepticality causes them to be cursed! :)

    Thanks for posting this up Phil, we gotta get it in our next show.

    Derek C.

  14. Nigel Depledge

    Nice article, Phil. I’m definitely with Tim B on this one – reading about the hoax (well, reading debunking pages, but these wouldn’t exist without the hoax) rekindled my interest and enthusiasm for the Apollo programme. For a long time, many years ago, I was jealous of my big brother because he had got to stay up late to watch Neil Armstrong’s famous small step on TV, but I hadn’t been born at that time (I came along 7 months later). Of course, he was too young to remember it, but that’s not the point.

    One part of your blog entry particularly struck a chord with me. Not too long ago, I visited the UK’s National Space Centre (being the renowned spacefaring nation that we are :-)). Among many other fascinating things, they had a little display about moon exploration. There was a short video playing on a loop (mostly footage from the Apollo 15, 16 & 17 missions, I think), which included that bit where one of the astronauts (I forget who it was) dropped a feather and a hammer at the same time, and (of course) they fell at exactly the same rate. That piece of film still blows my mind, because it looks so counter-intuitive. For my money, that alone crushes all the hoax claims.

    Anyway, I wandered around the side of the display, to see they had … a piece of moon rock! I stood there, absolutley entranced for about 3 or 4 minutes, just getting my mind around the concept : here in front of me was an actual piece of the moon, that has been brought back by one of the Apollo missions. It was only about 2 inches high, but it looked utterly unlike any piece of rock I had ever seen previously (I don’t have the words to describe it, other than to say it had this unearthly kind of glittery surface …. sorry about the pun).

    Anyway, keep up the good work.

  15. Ray Martinson– I think that sort of thing is inappropriate. I may truly hate what he did, but I don’t wish him dead. Nor do I wish Sibrel, Percy or any others the same. This is not a war of nations, it’s a war of intellect, and the battle should be fought with words and ideas.

  16. Jon J

    Maybe it’s not a war at all, but the natural process that brings us to knowledge. We need people to question the truth, and sometimes they will be right. It’s not a battle as much as a process of climbing stairs, one small step at a time. Look at the bigger picture: Many years from now Mr. Kaysing will not even be a footnote in the history books, but the moon landings were proved, beyond any doubt, that they are real, and history will have that recorded. Our solar system looks much different standing in the middle of it that it would from a few million miles outside of it.

  17. Jon said: “We need people to question the truth, and sometimes they will be right.”

    I have to agree with that. Just because someone choose to question what they have been told, does not make them a bad person. I think Ray has taken things a little to heart and lost perspective on this.

    It is a shame that some people cannot admit their original statements/assumptions where incorrect when later presented with valid counter arguements and proof.

    However, imo, It doesn’t really matter that Kaysing made claims about the moon landings validity. People on the whole should be encouraged to question everything we’re told and seek out ways to prove its the truth. So long as you are willing to accept reasonable answers to your questions and improve your understanding of the world, then imo there is no such thing as a silly question. The only shame is that Kaysing wouldn’t accept the answers to his questions regardless of the amount of evidance/proof.

    What is more worrying is the way the media latches onto these peoples claims even after they’ve been dissproved and help propergate incorrect claims. I never saw the fox special on the moon landing hoax, but we had a similar program (it might have even been the same one, I can’t remember) in the UK. This was at a time when all the counter-claims were availalbe on the web for anyone to read, yet the media chose to ignore that and focus just on the “hoax” claims.

    It wasn’t until months later that a second program air’d that showed counter claims for each of the original hoax claims. Why this couldn’t have been done in the first place is beyond me. It would have made for a much more interesting and thought provoking show.

  18. aiabx

    I’m not here to dance on anyone’s grave. It is sad that a man has died, and it is even sadder that he wasted so much of his life fostering ignorance and foolishness. What I take away from this is a desire to try harder in the fight against ignorance and superstition, and if that’s all the good that comes out of his demise, well, many people die for even less.
    -Andy B

  19. Bad Albert

    What Kaysing was did was inexcusable. But he was only one man. Perhaps the majority of the blame should be put on the millions who believed him despite the overwhelming evidence he was wrong.

  20. Blog Hunter

    I think that Jim Lovell said it very well in his June 24, 1996 letter to Kaysing (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=1596):

    “If you sincerely believe the United States faked the lunar landings then you are truly a tragic figure. You, like Don Quixote, are ’tilting windmills,’ and have wasted precious hours of your life in a futile quest. Take my advice. Tear up your manuscript and pursue a project that has some meaning. Leave a legacy you can be proud of, not some trash whose readers will doubt your sanity.”

  21. Robert Carnegie

    “Swans sing before they die – ’twere no bad thing
    Did certain persons die before they sing.”

    However, I think I’ve already argued hereabouts that young impressionable minds in particular should be exposed to a certain quantity of fairly easily detectable misinformation so that they get accustomed to checking whether they’re being misinformed.

  22. Are you sure he is dead?

  23. Just wondering where Mr. Kaysing found the sources, or inspirations of all these hoax and antiscience. Is it just a lethal superstitions?

    Charles Darwin cut and pasted his ideas about evolution mainly from the superstitions of 2,300 years earlier. Though his idea was based on the writings of the ancient Greek philosophers, Empedocles, and Aristotle.

    But surprisingly, he took the erroneous or incorrect part of their ideas.

    For example: He pasted on Aristotle’s foolish idea that changes in the bodies of parents would be passed on to the children. Even in Aristotle’s time, everyone knew that if a father lost an arm in warfare, his children born after that would still have two good arms.

    Darwin also pasted in the old “vitalism� superstition of creating life from nonliving things, like maggots from dead meat, which Redi disproved in 1665.

    Choosing lethal superstitions instead of science qualified Charles Darwin as an antiscientist.

    How we should evaluate Mr. William Bill Kaysing?

  24. Pat McCarthy

    I first heard of the lunar landing conspiracy theory only a couple years ago from a buddy of mine who is very passionate about science. My first question to him was: Why would anyone want to claim that the lunar landings were faked??? He thought the “hoax believers” (or HB’s…thank you Phil) were out to discredit Nixon. But, it seems to me that if you want to discredit Nixon HONESTLY, just say “Watergate.” And, consider that NASA was founded under Eisenhower’s administration as part of the response to Sputnik, and it was Kennedy who got us serious about putting men on the Moon. Nixon, in fact, cut NASA’s funding, forcing them to cancel the last three Apollo missions. (20 were originally planned.)

    In any case, since I’m already on a political bent here, I’ll go so far as to say I consider it unpatriotic to call the Apollo program a hoax. Why? I see the lunar landings as America’s greatest achievement since WWII (if not before), on social, technological and intellectual levels. (We simply haven’t done anything quite like it since, which is a shame…) We had the entire world watching in awe, and more signifcantly, all the effort and tax dollars went into a peaceful advancement of science (rather than some war costing thousands of lives on both sides). Granted it sprung from the Cold War, but had a very worthwhile outcome.

  25. Irv Thomas

    Having personally known Bill Kaysing for more than thirty years before his recent death, I have a couple things to note here . . .

    1. He had the boldness and bravery to stand up for what he believed, which is more than many laying into him here, who graze like sheep in the common pasture, accepting everything they’re told by a government that has demonstrably lied far too often, when it serves their purpose.

    2. He was a pretty decent guy, in many ways that those who slander him here could not possibly know.

    3. It’s just a bit too bad that he is remembered now for a crusade he could not let go of (perhaps foolishly, I’ll concur), rather than the many earlier things he did: a score of books on living simply in a too-complex world, cooking and eating in inexpensive and healthful ways, breaking free of the too-‘civilized’ mode we’re all stuck in, being your own person in a world in which that becomes increasingly difficult.

    Bill was an advocate for the homeless, the down-trodden, giving good, solid advice in every earlier work he published. Do him the honor of knowing what he did WELL, before you criticize what he did poorly. Think of how you’d be remembered, yourself, before you sling those stones.

  26. Irv Thomas, you appear to be laboring under a misconception. We do not feed at the trough of the government. I understand fully well the government can and will lie; I lived through Watergate, I lived through through Iran-Contra, and I’m alive right now.

    But just because the government can lie does not mean it is incapable of truth. There is no evidence– none– that the Moon landings were faked in any way. And in that, Bill Kaysing did a grievous misjustice on the world.

    He may have been a very decent fellow other than the Moon Hoax; I don’t deny that. But he also did terrible harm, wasting people’s time, efforts, and denigrating the tremendous work of hundreds of thousands of good people. This website and my efforts are not about sustainable living or being healthy, they are about astronomy and antiscience. I don’t want to see ad hominem attacks against Kaysing, but I will certainly allow a discussion of him as it pertains to what he did about the Moon landings.

    I am actually thankful for your reminder of his other works; it’s always good to remember that the people who purvey antiscience are real, actual people, capable of doing good. But it should also be remember that real, actual people, despite their good intentions, can do real, actual harm. A long as they do, and they use antiscience to do it, I will call them on it.

  27. How can I get a copy of the Fox presentation on the moon landing that aired 2/15/2001? Regards, R. Hearsch pheigh@basicisp.net

  28. Rachel Martin

    How can I get a copy of the Fox presentation on the moon landing that aired 2/15/2001?

  29. Um, are you Rachel or Robert?

    Anyway, you can’t. Fox doesn’t sell them. I cannot, of course, recommend you download illegally user WinMX or some other P2P software.

  30. WSCalkins

    I just finished reading Bill Kaysings book “Freedom Encyclopedia” I was impressed enough from this work to look him up on the internet. To my surprise, all I see are links to this hoax issue. Its a shame, you talk about all the time wasted that was instigated by this individual. Its funny, after reading another interview and this article on your website, I wonder who is doing the damage?

    Unfortunately unlike Irv Thomas, I have never had the privilage of meeting this person. But I wish I could have. It seems Bill Kaysing was a very worldly man, and a man unafraid to take on challenges. He seemed to be very conciencious in his research and probably for me, more importantly his genuinely positive human approach toward enjoying life. His experiences spoke very suscinctly to my personal pursuits.

    I have read another “different thinker” a Mr. Masanobu Fukuoka, one of his publications is “The One Straw Revolution.” I consider this man to be a master observationalist. Another confident individual who put his actions where his philosophies were. One of the things he has an issue with is how scientists think they can understand the whole from a micro-study of a part. He relates how much time and money is spent in the science of agriculture, creating much harm and diminishing results, when a much simplier approach would have worked better and more enviromentally conciencious. Sometimes we all have to take a step back to see the forest for the trees so to speak.

    My point is that I consider men like Bill Kaysing, Masanobu Fukuoka and Graham Hancock to be worldly people, taking a perspective not distracted by the influences of politics, religion, and institution. Thereby allowing them insights most of us would never think of, let alone try in our own lives. This sets the world stage for the next generation of discoverors and adventurers and even scientists, physicists et. al.

    Although politics, nationalism, religion, are all part of life, they are not “life.” You have tried to keep the discussion on track within the parameter of you website’s topic, but as you can see, there’s more to Astromomy than just technical science. If the people commenting here regarding Bill Kaysing studied his other pursuits in life, then I think this blog would be moot. Yes I think some of his remarks regarding NASA were extreme, yet, this topic could quickly spin into a discussion as to why funding to NASA has been greatly diminished, why a dominant leader in space exploration is falling behind other countries, why this and other areas of science are always hindered by “bottom line politics” and “opportunistic military interests.” But I digress into areas I have no expertise on. Its easy to talk about things you haven’t experienced first hand or otherwise. The people’s books I’ve mentioned here were written twenty and thirty years ago. It seems much has changed not necessarily for the good in terms of observation, experience and relative intention.

    I hope the people commenting on your website take the time to research more indepth people like I have mentioned before they “discredit” a whole person on one deed. I appreciate your allowing comments on your webpage, your open mindedness and concern for your area of interest is commendable. Thanks again Phil for the opportunity to add my perspectives.

  31. Dominic Corby

    Hi

    While I am sorry a man has died, his work has been nothing but harmful.

    I am in an on going battle with a hoax believer who refuses to accept any evidence to the contrary and who calls this site rubbish.

  32. So Bill Kaysing has finally died. Was he murdered by the government for revealing the “truth” about Apollo? No. did the so-called astronauts “off” him for dissing them? No. Was he abducted by aliens? No.
    He was just a sad little old man who made a big stink among the more ignorant members of our society.
    Sometimes I almost admire him. Mediums and snake-oil salesmen (ask James Randi for a list) make millions off the less intelligent, but this guy Kaysing was living in a trailer? Who is less honorable?

  33. Alexus

    You know, all these theories and claims about stage lighting, no stars, flag waving, etc… are too high for me. However, one question I keep asking myself: Armstrong was supposingly the “first man on the moon”. But, who was the guy filming him, when he stepped out of the Hubble? The shot was not from inside the craft, but outside. So, technically, wouldn’t the camera-guy be the first man on the moon? Also…what about as the Hubble was leaving again? Who filmed that? Did they sacrifice someone just to get a perfect shot of the Hubble?

    I am not claiming to be certain, but it is something that has been bothering me for some time. Looking forward to comments.

  34. amy

    what was the cause of death?

  35. Blondin

    Alexus,

    The answer to your question about the external camera can be found here:
    http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a11/a11.summary.html

    “Finally, about six and a half hours after the landing, they had the hatch open and Armstrong crawled out onto the porch – feet first and on his hands and knees. Moments later he was on the top rung of the ladder and pulled a lanyard to release a workbench/stowage area that was attached to the side of the LM. The Modular Equipment Storage Assembly or MESA was pivoted at the bottom so that, when Armstrong pulled the lanyard, the MESA swung down into a horizontal position. The most important piece of gear on it was undoubtedly the black-and-white TV camera. It was mounted in such a way that, when the MESA swung down, the camera was pointed directly at the foot of the ladder.”

    I’m not sure why you’re referring to the “Hubble”. I think you mean the ascent stage of the lunar module. No one filmed the launch of the ascent stage of Apollo 11. It wasn’t until Apollo 15 that they had a remote TV camera mounted on the rover that they filmed the departure from the moon. This camera was controlled from Earth. Look here for some info about how they did that:
    http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a15/video15.html#launch

  36. gary

    you guys are sad…if they were to fake it ..it would show up in photography and the simulation of moon gravity..if you remember the invention of SLR cameras you realized what a differrence that made in the final image..these guys didn’t have SLR cameras ..they were adjusting Fstops and focusing manually ..

    the simulation of lunar gravity i think is the easiest way to see the hoax in all its glory..check at 1:25 of this video clip..ask yourself “when he stands is this the energy that uprights him or are wires taking some of the weight of the back off his back”…this one is obvious..

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2292318864748308067&q=apollo+17+deep+core

    note also that a 200lb pack has the “weight” of 30lbs on the moon and he should not run out of breath later around 3:00min

  37. knave84

    I don’t know about waving flags, stars ,craters, radiation belts, shadows, lighting and stuff like that…but I do know that the Russians were way ahead of the Americans in technical expertise..I do know that it has been more than 30 years and no one has gone to the moon since..I do know that the truth will only reveal itself if another country goes to the moon and sees all the stuff they left behind..

    PS…Can’t the hubble get high resolution pictures of the moons surface?
    PS2..how come communication with earth is so…real time?
    ps3..why are the kennedy files sealed till 2017? Maybe that’s when the US will go to the moon for real..so the hoax will not matter as much any more..

  38. KaiYeves

    It’s a good picture, BA. I feel those same feelings when I see it. It pushes home what Dr. Sagan said a lot, that if for no other reason, exploring space is worth it because it shows what being human truly means. This picture is not about hate, it’s not about fighting, it’s not about causing harm to another, it’s about science. It’s about learning. Together. Together to the stars.

  39. Thank you for this thread.

  40. Jen

    I think we went to the moon and anyone who thinks other wise I think is a dork!!!!!!!! Did you no america and russia were having a cold war.

  41. Tom

    ive spent the last 48 hours basicly none stop reading about the supposed hoax, its fascinating to me,

    the picture at the top of this page is truely one of the most inspiring photos i have ever seen in my life (and actaully brought tears to my eyes)

    thanks for the artical, some really good comments on here that really make me think
    thanks
    Tom

  42. syed

    help me here, i am 11 years kid. i need to know if he really died in space.

    p.s tell me the truth at my msn that is soccer4life_97@hotmail.com.

  43. Tim

    A couple of things that don’t get talked about much is that firstly how come the Soviet Union who had spent billions of dollars on their attempts to get to the moon didn’t spot that it was a fake and tell the world !

    Another point to ask the hoax believers is that why, after making the first hoax, did NASA go on to make another 6 (including one with an accident)?

    You will always get people who jump on to the conspiracy bandwagon, just look at the 9/11 atrocity and the nutters who say it was the CIA that did it, I wonder how many of them belong to the Flat Earth Society.

    Anyway thank you for your book Phil, like you I am very pleased to have lived to witness the greatest achivement by the human race in its eniire history

  44. Cameron

    We live in a society of cheaters and cheated. The cheaters (media, gov officials, industry leaders) all promise to give pleasure or protection for those who follow with total disregard to the people and environment. We have seen conspiracies before – Watergate. Most people (around 93% apparently) are sheep and the cheaters prey on these people as they are so easy to convince. Why would Gissem put a big lemon in the photo of an Appolo mission and then shortly after he and his wife are killed? Why does Buz cry every time someone asks him about the trip? Why didn’t they leave a flag up there for later telescopical viewing and proof? How can you travel 950,000,000 miles in 3 days at 1,000,000 miles an hour?

  45. Nick

    Hello Phil,
    I’m not an astronomer by any stretch of the imagination and only recently in fact heard about the conspiracy theory that the moon landings were faked. However the story has I admit intrigued me as to why anyone would disbelieve it happened. Having done the research, I heard of yourself and Mr Kaysing and that FOX programme but probably won’t get a chance to see it. I am doing a presentation on the antithesis of the moon landings and would appreciate any help you can lend. I’ve head all the theories about staged photos, parallel shadows and deaths of certain NASA officials from the time but I would much rather hear the evidence that blows that all out of the water. Is there any chance you could write a short e-mail that I can include in my presentation, or do you have any links to other sites that might help?
    Thankyou for your time
    Nick Wells

  46. tudza

    Nick

    Many countries picked up the radio traffic from the moon. You think many of them, oh Russia maybe, wouldn’t have called us on it if these signals weren’t obviously what they should be?

  47. Nick

    Tudza

    Exactly. I agree. It sounds silly that anyone could believe Kaysing. Never mind though. Managed to convince everyone in my presentation that the hoax theory was in fact in itself a hoax.

  48. Chris

    Why would the Russians rat out the USA for faking the moon mission? Aren’t they our friends? They’re all good Commies right? Aren’t the Commies our friends? Or is it just our favored nation trade buddy, good ol Communist China?

    Oceania was never at war with Eurasia. You must be mistaken.

  49. Paul Kersey

    I only found out about the moon trip hoax stuff while researching Bill Kasying online. Bill wrote and distributed several other books, some of which I collected and found interesting. One was a magazine sized pamphlet called HOMES FOR THE HOMELESS. It’s a shame that didn’t see larger circulation. His common sense thinking surely helped someone out there. He also wrote Great Hideouts Of The West and a number of books on eating cheap, growing your own garden, hot springs locations, etc. Just run KAYSING on ebay and you’ll find some of his old books for sale. That said, let’s not walk around talking trash about Bill Kaysing. I don’t see his theories on the moon trip any better or worse than the Kennedy assassination theorists. People waste time of their own free will, so let ol’ Bill rest in peace. He didn’t kick in your back door and rob you of your time; you went of your own free will.

  50. Ray

    With the latest news about the erased original footage of the landing,is certainly a fly in the ointment. NASA’s explanation is defies belief.When you are talking about a moment in time featuring mankind’s greatest accomplishment (costing $billions) and they erased the tapes? Yeah right. I think the wheels are starting to fall off folk and poor Bill will be laughing from the grave. I’m sure there’s more to come.

  51. Barbara

    The reason I know for a fact man did not go to the moon is the Bible tells me this.
    God gave man dominion only over the earth, not the heavens.
    The moon is included in the heavens.
    Man did not walk on the moon, he never even went there.
    Thank God for the Holy Bible where every answer to every question is.
    I appreciate Bill Kaysing’s great work in expsoing this hoax.
    God used him.

  52. Alan G. Archer

    Cameron,
    I will answer your questions as best I can.
    You ask, “Why would Gissem put a big lemon in the photo of an Appolo mission and then shortly after he and his wife are killed?”
    Virgil Ivan “Gus” Grissom attached a large home-grown lemon to an Apollo simulator that he was dissatisfied with. Later that week, on January 27, 1967, Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee were killed in a fire during a test of the AS-204 Command Module (Apollo 1). His widow, Betty Moore Grissom, lived on into the 21st century.
    Concerning Buzz Aldrin, you ask, “Why does Buz cry every time someone asks him about the trip?”
    Every time? Mr. Aldrin has spoken dry-eyed about the Apollo 11 mission on a number of occasions.
    A good question: “Why didn’t they leave a flag up there for later telescopical viewing and proof?”
    Conceivably, a pair of Apollo astronauts could have, with respectful intentions, unrolled a large, UV-resistant flag across the surface of the Moon. An American garrison flag (6.1 m x 11.6 m) on the Moon, for example, would require a truly mammoth telescope in Earth orbit or on the surface of the Earth (with adaptive optics) to detect it. Such telescopes have yet to be built. A better, less expensive solution would be to place a high-resolution camera in lunar orbit, like the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera currently in operation, to image the large flag at a surface spatial resolution of 0.5 m per pixel or better. But there is no guarantee, of course, that all people would accept such large flags visible from Earth or from a lunar orbiter as proof that the Apollo missions were authentic. (Thomas Demski’s “The Superflag” is 154 m in length. If that flag were on the Moon, the Hubble Space Telescope may be able resolve a one or two pixel image of it. Unfortunately, the epic flag weights some 1,361 kg on Earth, the weight of more than six Lunar Rover Vehicles.)
    Lastly, you ask, “How can you travel 950,000,000 miles in 3 days at 1,000,000 miles an hour?”
    I can not do this. Are these distance, time, and velocity figures related to an Apollo mission?

  53. Alan G. Archer

    Cameron,
    I will answer your questions as best I can.
    You ask, “Why would Gissem put a big lemon in the photo of an Appolo mission and then shortly after he and his wife are killed?”
    Virgil Ivan “Gus” Grissom attached a large home-grown lemon to an Apollo simulator that he was dissatisfied with. Later that week, on January 27, 1967, Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee were killed in a fire during a test of the AS-204 Command Module (Apollo 1). His widow, Betty Moore Grissom, lived on into the 21st century.
    Concerning Buzz Aldrin, you ask, “Why does Buz cry every time someone asks him about the trip?”
    Every time? Mr. Aldrin has spoken dry-eyed about the Apollo 11 mission on a number of occasions.
    A good question: “Why didn’t they leave a flag up there for later telescopical viewing and proof?”
    Conceivably, a pair of Apollo astronauts could have, with respectful intentions, unrolled a large, UV-resistant flag across the surface of the Moon. An American garrison flag (6.1 m x 11.6 m) on the Moon, for example, would require a truly mammoth telescope in Earth orbit or on the surface of the Earth (with adaptive optics) to detect it. Such telescopes have yet to be built. A better, less expensive solution would be to place a high-resolution camera in lunar orbit, like the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera currently in operation, to image the large flag at a surface spatial resolution of 0.5 m per pixel or better. But there is no guarantee, of course, that all people would accept such large flags visible from Earth or from a lunar orbiter as proof that the Apollo missions were authentic. (Thomas Demski’s “The Superflag” is 154 m in length. If that flag were on the Moon, the Hubble Space Telescope may be able to resolve a one or two pixel image of it. Unfortunately, the epic flag weights some 1,361 kg on Earth, the weight of more than six Lunar Rover Vehicles.)
    Lastly, you ask, “How can you travel 950,000,000 miles in 3 days at 1,000,000 miles an hour?”
    I can not do this. Are these distance, time, and velocity figures related to an Apollo mission?

  54. george

    Bill Kaysing is a Great Man. A Man that talks the Truth absent of fear of any kind. When Kaysing said there is no Blast Crator under the LEM. He said, That to me is conclusive evidence of a Hoax.
    He said, No way am I looking at a Lander that landed on the moon.

  55. Martin Roberts

    I have not seen a single piece of footage showing an astronaut jumping higher than he could on earth.
    Beyond all reasonable doubt, we did not go.

  56. Messier Tidy Upper

    Bill Kaysing was a man.
    An individual who, I gather, had some good ideas.
    However, he will probably go down in history for promoting and stubbornly clinging to one particular very dumb, nasty and easily debunked idea despite having many oportunities to change his mind – namely the ridiculous and, frankly, insulting idea that the Moon landings (& indeed pretty much *all* human spaceflight) were deliberately faked.

    As a person Bill Kaysing might’ve been okay, but his Moon Hoax idea was utterly wrong and deluded.

    Its a shame that he personally didn’t have the wisdom and courage to accept when he was wrong and admit he’d erred – as we all err from time to time.

    (Me probably more than most! 😉 )

    Rest In Peace Bill Kaysing.

    May your Moon Hoax ideas soon rest forever with you.

    And thanks Phil Plait for showing more grace and forgiveness towards this poor foolish human being than I’d have done & for your post above.

  57. Messier Tidy Upper

    57. Martin Roberts Says:

    I have not seen a single piece of footage showing an astronaut jumping higher than he could on earth. Beyond all reasonable doubt, we did not go.

    Given their cumbersome, awkward spacesuits and the weight of the Oxygen tanks and other gear they were wearing don’t you think the fact they could jump *at all* is proof they were indeed on the Moon?

    We have more than ample evidence that the Apollo moon landings – not just 11 but also :

    12 Charles “Pete” Conrad, Alan Bean & CM pilot Richard Gordon
    14 Alan B. Shepard, Edgar Mitchell& CM pilot Stuart Roosa
    15 David Scott, James Irwin & CM pilot Alfred Worden
    16 John W. Young, Charles Duke & CM pilot Ken Mattingly
    &
    17 Eugene Cernan, , Harrison H. “Jack” Schmitt & CM pilot Ronald Evans

    All these men (& sorry ladies but they were all men) did indeed land on the Moon.

    Also that Apollo 13 (Lovell, Haise & Swigert)in arguably the greatest adventure yet encountered in space circle dtehMoon and retruned safely – just -forty years ago this year.

    Also that Apollo 8 (Lovell, Anders, Borman) and Apollo 10 (Stafford, Young, Cernan) circled the Moon successfully wghile other Apolloand manned space misisons achieved some incredible – but real – accomplishmenstand successes and flew into space.

    This is not in dispute – or at least the evidence is so great and overwhelming and the claims to the contrary so unsupported by the actual available evidence that it shouldn’t be in any dispute. Not really.

    ********************
    CM = Command Module.

  58. Reed

    I think we went to the moon but I just don’t believe the official version. We went and we found many artificial artifacts or things up there. The rest is a mistery.

  59. Darrel Doberstein

    Could you explain me more about the second paragraph, please.

  60. John Flushing

    Personally, I think the best proof that we went to Luna would be to send a space probe into orbit, and take a picture of the bottom half of the landing craft. (The bottom half of the landing craft is still there, assuming that we actually went there). They already took a picture of the Opportunity Rover, in order to prove that the Opportunity Rover exists. It would make sense to do something similar with the Apollo vehicles.

  61. Alain

    I’ve read a lot of comments stating that the idea of the moon landing being a hoax is ridiculous. But can someone explain the issue of the Van Allen radiation belt, and how the astronauts were able to travel safely through this.

  62. Ronaldo

    I watched it on TV as an 11year old kid and I believed it. But I believed everything that adults told me back then. Now as a 54 year old man I have questions. Just answer the questions with data and provable facts and I’ll believe again. I have a long list of questions.

  63. caskur

    I have a good idea. Why don’t you tell NASA to give Western Australia’s Juniper family back the rocks and fossils they took and never returned? The rocks were from the Simpson Desert Australia. Let me guess, all the rocks are in museums around the world being claimed as moon rocks, right?

    Man stepping on the moon was a hoax.

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