So how do you spell DNA?

By Phil Plait | September 7, 2008 10:35 am

Well, this explains PZ at least.

Tip o’ the PCR machine to Twitter follower jnaz.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Humor
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Comments (20)

Links to this Post

  1. Links and Video of the Week (2008/37) :: cimddwc | September 14, 2008
  1. madge

    So the verbopressin hormone makes you misrepresent or make things up? Can we synthesise an antidote? Only for use on conspiracy theorists, religious fundamentalists and the like. We will give the creative artists and writers etc full freedom
    :)

  2. madge

    Oh and BA? Any chance of reinstating the Sunday night live web chat? I know you must be really busy ( Oh Great One ) with JREF and the book and cons and EVERYTHING, but we, your humble minions, sure do miss our Sunday night fix.( madge goes off to prostrate herself before the illuminated alter on which stands the sacred i-madge of THE ONE we (who are not worthy) call The Great and Munificent Phil)
    :)

  3. Madge – I like the way you think.

  4. Gary Ansorge

    I absolutely LOVE the last sentence in that “article”. Most writers could use such a suppository to get them off their couch and running,,,

    Should forward this to Colbert,,,

    GAry 7

  5. madge

    Jewel- I like the way you like the way you think I think….I think :)

  6. Pierre

    This explains PZ you say? Well, if anything in that article was even remotely true, it
    woudl show that PZ’s science writing gene is in excellent shape (ah, a folding joke).
    PZ write wonderfully well, as we all know.

    Myself, I like the VERY last sentence of the article, the Reference to the monogamy gene
    stupidity we’ve been hearing about recently. The science writing gene story is a good
    satire of that bunk.

  7. Is it a parody? Or not?

  8. David

    It’s almost entirely a “quote” of the New Scientist article with an amazingly small number of changes. There is a “Reference” at the end of the article to the original, or at least the first part of the original, unless you subscribe to New Scientist.

  9. Best line ever:

    “Not only that, men with two copies of IMl33t were more likely to pull random facts out of actual research and completely misinterpret them.”

    Tee hee hee. Silly boys! ūüėČ

  10. Wow, I thought it was completely made up… thanks for that, David!

  11. Dave Hall

    madge Says:
    So the verbopressin hormone makes you misrepresent or make things up? Can we synthesise an antidote? Only for use on conspiracy theorists, religious fundamentalists and the like. We will give the creative artists and writers etc full freedom

    Just ONE more use, please?
    Can we make in liquid form and then use the government’s secret chemtrail aircraft to spray it over Washington DC. With an extra dose on the White House and the Capitol Building?

  12. I’m heading to the doctor next week to get my IMl33T levels checked, and see about my oreillytocin levels.

  13. Radwaste

    “In neocons and fundamentalists, receptors for the two systems sit at adjacent desks, so grant applications get a lot of attention, leading to government funded research into why the government shouldn‚Äôt fund research.”

    I detect contamination by the Adams virus. That’s OK. I wish I could write like Douglas, too!

  14. Davidlpf

    I wonder if there is a genetic connection between not being flexable with definations with words like irony or gas.

  15. CandidoH

    I wonder if IMl33t also affects twitch reflexes in computer games…

  16. I suspect IMl33t also causes people to periodica1ly repl4ce rand0m 1etter5 wi7h numb3r5 th4t l0ok l1k3 13773r5.

  17. JTDC

    It should have been IM1337. n00bs.

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