Space Gizmo

By Phil Plait | September 15, 2009 3:07 pm

I just got word of a new space blog on the block: Space Gizmo, by a young space enthusiast who posts videos and pictures of spacey things past, present, and future. It’s actually a pretty good compendium of such things, and it’ll make it a lot easier on me to find the videos I’m always combing YouTube and NASA for. He also has a calendar in the sidebar of upcoming events, which is pretty handy. All in all, worth dropping into your RSS feed.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Space

Comments (7)

  1. Hi, I just wanted to thank you for mention Space Gizmo and while its still a work in progress its great that people enjoy the site. Hopefully I can eventually get a handle on not being such a noob, and make it even better for all to enjoy.

  2. Silicate

    Well if Phil Plait suggests it, it’s usually damn well worth checking out. And collections of astronomy-related media can never be a bad thing… unless they’re pathetic arguments for the moon-landing “hoax.” But that’s really only tangentially astronomy-related.

    This is _completely_ OT, and hopefully I’m not severely violating any netiquette laws in posting this, but I had an astronomy question I was hoping some commenters here (or even The BadAstronomer Man himself, if he felt like it!) might be willing to offer some perspectives on…
    If the Solar System were located on the very edge of the Milky Way Galaxy (as opposed to about 2/3 of the way from the center to the edge, where we actually are), would we still see the milky way (that is, the band of light in the night sky) as we do now? Would it be different? …My understanding is that of course we’d see it, but it would be different in that we’d only see it as a partial band in one direction (that is, we’d see it if we were on the part of Earth that happened to be pointing towards it at that time of year, that time of night), instead of a band that pretty much encircles us, like the way we see it now. Is that an accurate assumption? Also, would it be brighter, since we’re looking at all of the galaxy in one direction? Or would interfering gas/dust make it about the same brightness as we see it now? Thoughts?
    Again, sorry for the OT comment, but this is the coolest place with the most interesting conversations regarding astronomy that I know of. Thanks.

  3. Asimov Fan

    The Gizmo from Outer Space was one of my favourite books as a very little kid.

    Wonder if “Space Gizmo” also read that and that’s what inspired the blog name or not? ;-)

    BA I also wonder if you have any advice or tips or anything for people wanting to do their own astronomy or science or other blogs?

    I marvel that you can write so much, so well & so often! Thanks. :-D

  4. Maugrim

    Asimov Fan – I think you just answered your own question. Above all, write lots, write it well and write it often! That’s all it takes to make a good blog, for me, though of course the final determinant for whether I’m following it or not is whether the subject matter interests me.

  5. An1mal

    Not too shabby at all…..but then he had a lovely pic of Discovery sitting under the MDD at Dryden….As much as I love the shuttle, any one of them, dammit they need to feature the MDD’s more!!!!!!!!!!!1

  6. Asimov Fan

    @ 2. Silicate Says:

    This is _completely_ OT, and hopefully I’m not severely violating any netiquette laws in posting this, but I had an astronomy question I was hoping some commenters here (or even The BadAstronomer Man himself, if he felt like it!) might be willing to offer some perspectives on…

    If the Solar System were located on the very edge of the Milky Way Galaxy (as opposed to about 2/3 of the way from the center to the edge, where we actually are), would we still see the milky way (that is, the band of light in the night sky) as we do now? Would it be different? …

    I’d suggest posting that question on the Bad Astronomy Universe Today Forum see :

    http://www.bautforum.com/

    I don’t know that too many people will post / look at comments here. Esp. now when its been pushed down the list a lot by newer posts.

    For What It’s Worth : My guess is that you are pretty much right – perhaps we’d have a half & half sky with half really starry with a visible Milky Way plane (the half looking inwards galactic-wise) & half really dark with very few if any other stars although there would still be some further out and passing through from the Galactic halo as, for instance, Arcturus may be doing from our skies.

    But that’s just my guess & I’d try asking this on the BAUT forum rather than this thread to get a better answer.

  7. Silicate

    Asimov Fan, thank you for the response and advice. I will indeed post there as well. I figured I wouldn’t get too many responses here, since it was so OT, but hoped it might spark a discussion. Since it obviously has not, I’ll see what happens on the suggested forum. Thanks.

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