So, um, ist das gut?

By Phil Plait | June 13, 2010 8:00 am

Tod aus dem All coverIn January, the German translation of my book Death from the Skies! came out. Over there, it’s got the cooler name Tod aus dem All, and has a cool cover, too.

I was wondering what people in Germany thought of the book, and (because my three years of German classes were a while back) even after seeing this young man review it, I’m still wondering:

So, um, is this good? He keeps holding up the book; does he want his money back? I hope not, since the guarantee on the book is only good for 1092 years, or until all its protons decay, whichever comes first.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: DeathfromtheSkies!
MORE ABOUT: Tod aus dem All

Comments (66)

  1. shawmutt

    Da book ees thick…

    …or not thick

    That’s about all I got, sorry, took Spanish in High School

  2. Pierre

    Has proton decay ever been observed? Is there even an estimate for
    a proton’s half life, or is it just speculation? Since the universe is
    only about 1010 years old, I suspect that if the
    proton decay’s half life is a few order of magnitude larger it would
    never have been observed yet…

  3. Pierre

    Never mind my dumb questions. Wikipedia has all the answers… :-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_decay

  4. judy

    He recomends the book for people who are interested in astronomy but find the works of people like Hawking too difficult. And also for those who would like to have a science book in their library :) . He said that is’s a good read, easy to understand, but some people might find it boring because there are just a few pictures in it, and he shows an example.
    He keeps holding up the book to show the title, subtitle, thikness and says it’s a pocket book version. He gives the page count, chapters, main themes, short author bio and all in all he liked the book (and it’s his first book review).

  5. He likes it. He finds it interesting and entertaining. But he says that for some people there are perhaps not enough pictures in the book.

  6. joebroesel

    “…might be boring for some since it contains mostly text…”
    You dared to put text in a book?? :)

    But overall positive review. Recommends it to people who don’t understand astronomy on the level of a Steven Hawking or had no interest in astronomy so far.

    A German

  7. NewEnglandBob

    I tried using “translate this web site” but the guy was still speaking German. ;)

  8. Messier Tidy Upper

    Ve are happy Germans, ja? ;-)

  9. Joe

    Lol not enough pictures? Are you serious?

    Kids these days…

  10. Du shriebst ein buch? (You wrote a book?)

  11. So, that sheet of paper he held up – was that what he paid?

  12. Wow…I thought from his facial expressions he was probably panning it. But if you guys say it was a good review, then I think he needs to work on his presentation.
    I wonder if he had to do it as a school project. He is definitely projecting a sort of “I have to do this, I am bored by this and if you insist…here’s my book review” vibe.

  13. So, that sheet of paper he held up – was that what he paid?

    No, it’s a map of the Sudetenland. Uh-oh.

    Es tut mir leid.

  14. Mario

    Don’t mention the war!

  15. Lukas

    Interesting, entertaining, easily understandable with basic school knowledge, not enough pictures for some people. He mostly talks about what’s in the book, which I guess Phil might already know.

    @Vagueofgodalming: no, it’s 10^39 years, which supposedly is when the universe ends or something.

  16. lis

    He likes the book but admits this is his first book review. ;) He also spends too much time telling us the name of the book and about you, than actually reviewing the book..

  17. Mchl

    @Non-Believer (#11): I believe that’s how all reviews are being done in Germany. Thorough, detailed, well planned, and boring.

    (@all Germans here: I’m sorry about this joke ;) )

  18. michael

    Uh oh. If one of the amazon reviewers is to be believed the book contains a major translation gaffe: Apparently silicon was consistently translated with „Silikon“ (= “silicone”, the rubber), not „Silizium“ (the element).

  19. Elmar_M

    The author talks a lot about the content of the books. He recommends it for pretty much everyone, but especially for those that like “lighter” science content in a book, compared to a Hawking (not that Hawkings books are usually that “heavy” either).
    Anyway, the review was quite positive, though maybe not presented in a very exciting way by the fellow.
    Only negative comment he made, was that it was maybe a bit boring for some people, because “the book is so much text and only few illustrations”.
    But, then he later says that the science is presented in an entertaining fashion…
    Well whatever…
    Generally the review was very positive and he recommends it.

  20. Lao Tzu

    The amazon review also states that the text refers to an appendix which does not actually exist in the German edition. The author of the review blames the German publisher for these errors, and that’s why he does not give the full five stars.

  21. Sili

    Du shriebst ein buch? (You wrote a book?)

    Aber nein! Es heist “Sie haben einen Buch geschreibt?”*

    *Not valid where German is spoken.

  22. I think “Tod aus dem All” should be your next tattoo. Maybe across your knuckles, in Gothic script.

    I prefer my book reviews to be more like life in Hobbes’s State of Nature: nasty, brutish, and short.

  23. I took 3 years of German, too — about 20 years ago. No idea what he said. Hope it’s good, though!

  24. Apparently silicon was consistently translated with „Silikon“ (= “silicone”, the rubber), not „Silizium“ (the element).

    That would explain the confusion of countless German teen boys when pondering the chapter on heavenly bodies.

  25. Jenz

    Hmm, 11€?
    That’s pretty reasonably priced!
    I wonder if I will find a lot of “Wie verdammt cool ist das denn?” (How freaking cool is that?) inside…

    *grin*

    o/

    Jenz

  26. Mchl

    You can’t possibly count the number of dissapointed young men realising what Silicon Valley is about.

  27. Watoosh

    I think I caught the main gist of what he said. It’s been over three years since I studied German, so listening comprehension takes a lot of effort. My brain registers directly simple statements, but many words just fly past in rapid speech and I have to pick up on simple words out of context and try to make sense of them. More complicated words require concentration to recognize and translate, which means I have to stop every once in a while to let my brain work it out.

    What I gathered was “Here’s this book by this American astronomer, it’s about 400 pages long, it’s got nine chapters and it’s a paperback edition. It’s about how the Universe is going to kill us, here are some examples: *lists examples* It’s pretty good I guess – not many pictures though.”

  28. Thanny

    I read recently that an experiment designed to test proton decay showed negative results, so the notion is currently unsupported.

  29. John Baxter

    My two years of high school German in 1955-57 aren’t up to the task, despite Mrs. Albrecht’s excellent efforts. (See, I remember SOMETHING from the class.) And one semester at MIT didn’t help–although I got better on the final than I deserved, thanks to the German to English prose translation part being a piece of a history of California. (California schools were strong on that in those days, giving me an unfair advantage. )

    Silicon Valley, indeed.

  30. humble reader

    @romeo & sili
    Sorry to disagree, but it’s “haben…geschrieben” or
    “Du hasst…geschrieben” for Phils friends.
    “shrieb” or “schriebst” without haben also go.

    Actually a book from an “ami” getting any review
    from a german is pretty good ;)

    US expat in germany.

  31. Ok, as a native german I first have to say: I love your attempts to translate! I always (almost) lough my *** off! Thanks for that!

    Second thing: This guy says almost NOTHING, and it looks like he was ill-prepared to try to review that book. Sorry to say that, but it also looks like 1. he knew nothing about the author, 2. he isn’t really interested in astronomy, 3. he just read it for teh lulz!!1!

    And, by the way, it’s: “Sie haben einen Buch geschrieben?”

    Off to the first german soccer world championship match… ;)

  32. Oh, I almost forgot: I bought the german translation about 2 weeks ago, had no time to read it since today, but I will do. Maybe I’ll do my own review then…

    /Or likely not … I’m no YouTube attention whore… :)

  33. I’ve got the book some weeks before the publication. I like it very much, but – as mentioned before – the translation is suboptimal. Unfortunately I’ve found “Silikon” instead of “Silicium” in about 80% of the books I’ve read the last years. The apparently non-existing editorial offices in german publishing houses is a real problem. Around the IYA 2009, the translations of many astronomical books were quick and dirty.

    You’ll find my positive review here (in german):
    http://www1.astronomie.de/phpapps/buchbesprechung/showbook.php?id=293

  34. Strahlungsamt

    Dont knock ze Germans so quickly.

    They snuck into Area 51 and make a music video before the FBI caught them.

    How kool ist das?

  35. AJ

    I see a few people have noted translation errors (silicon/silicone) from English to German, and one person has blamed the publishers. It could be worse… the early German publishers (since, thankfully, dropped) of Terry Pratchett’s ‘Discworld’ series actually put things like adverts for soup *in the text of the novels*.

  36. Strahlungsamt

    They also made the funniest Star Trek parody ever.

  37. Wayne Robinson

    “… einen Buch geschrieben?” Accusative, … masculine? But “Buch” is neuter. So you must use “ein Buch”! So it’s; “Sie haben ein Buch gescchrieben?” Write that out 100 times and if it isn’t finished before dawn, I’ll cut your … Sorry, I lapsed into Monty Python modus …

  38. jcm

    “So, um, ist das gut?”

    Ja.

  39. Ben

    “Du hast doch nicht etwa ein Buch geschrieben? Haha!” :P

    (Sorry, couldn’t let the opportunity pass to post in German.)

  40. Hansi68

    after so much postings about german SciFi, you just have to (Realy have to, it´s an alpha Order!) watch this one:

    This was before Star Trek with Kirk & Spock!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAIRlgTf7ms&feature=related

    and to comment the guy with this book in his camera. It´s his very first book reception ever. Don´t blame him on this. He is not Reich Ranitzki, so dont think about it what he is saying – just give us ($w!nning($occer/($)! Germans a direct link to order it)). My local BookShop in Frankfurt/Main (The german city with the Airport and the Euro) doesn´t have it in his normal program .

  41. The Mutt

    I learned all my German from reading Haunted Tank comics.

    Does that title translate to The Death of Us All?

  42. Jennifer

    I bought the book a while ago for the schol library I work in and it has been checked out quite a bit – so far all the kids liked it. They enjoyed the descriptions at the beginning of each chapter in particular (and I wish that the edition had the cartoon cover, I bet that would appeal to them).

    I second what Bernd Hoffmann says about the glaring mistakes the translator made and I actually picked up a pen and corrected those mistakes because I couldn’t stand the thought of the kids reading it like that. The science geek won over the librarian there.
    Translation seems to become a lost form of art in Germany, both in movies and in books. I sometimes wonder where the people who work as translators learned English and if they are so badly payed that they cannot afford a dictionary (which may have helped with the silicone-silicon problem). Proofreading has died out, too.

    Hansi68: your bookshop should be able to order it without problems, usually in 24 hours.

  43. “Uh oh. If one of the amazon reviewers is to be believed the book contains a major translation gaffe: Apparently silicon was consistently translated with „Silikon“ (= “silicone”, the rubber), not „Silizium“ (the element).”

    This is, unfortunately, a common mistake. It’s basically down to publishers hiring language students as translators, even if they know nothing of the subject. Finding someone who knows something about the subject and is fluent in two languages is expensive (I know; I’ve been paid to do such translations by more generous publishers).

    I once read a review of Steven Weinberg’s Dreams of a Final Theory in the magazine of the German Physical Society. The conclusion: we can recommend the book, but not the translation. One howler was rendering “the light-element abundances” as “eine Fülle von Lichtelementen” (roughly, “a large amount of light (i.e. photons, not non-heavy) elements”), while the correct translation would be “die Häufigkeiten der leichten Elemente”.

    It’s not limited to science. In a book about music, I ran across “Drittelgesang”, whereas the correct translation would be “Terzgesang”. (In English, “third” refers to the musical interval, to the fraction and to the ordinal number. In German, these are three separate words, though the words for the ordinal number and the fraction are similar.)

  44. Nigel Depledge

    Humble reader (30) said:

    “Du hasst…geschrieben” for Phils friends.

    Eh? I thought second-person-singular familiar present indicative of “haben” was “du hast”. I think “du hasst” actually means something completely different.

    Hmmm … need to consult someone who knows more Deutsch than I.

    PS, you missed out the apostrophe in “Phil’s”. Bad BABlogee! ;-)

  45. Jennifer

    Du hasst would be you hate ;) I think I would hate learning German as a second language :)

    Phillip Helbig: it’s not limited to textbooks, either. I can understand making mistakes translating a text on a subject you don’t know much about. But translating figures of speech literally or actually getting things like become/bekommen, genial/genial and shellfish/Schellfisch wrong? Facepalm.

  46. apaeter

    I can’t watch the video here at work, at least not with sound, but this is a fun thread to read (I’m looking at you, commenter #13 – I shouldn’t be reading this at work, and you almost gave me away).
    Anyway: “Du hast ein Buch geschrieben.” – ‘You wrote a book.’/'You have written a book.’
    “Du schriebst ein Buch.” – technically in Ordnung, but similar to saying something like ‘You spake unto me…” it’s weird and outdated.

  47. Nigel Depledge

    Jennifer (45) said:

    Du hasst would be you hate

    Of course! From the Rammstein song “Du hasst”.

    BTW, Rammstein lyrics are definitely NSFW* – only google them from the safety of your own home.

    *Especially “Mein Teil”. Ew.

  48. Oh cool, people actually read my amazon review. I just hope that the book sells well enough to print a corrected version without the translation mistake.

  49. deranged cat

    Well, I didn’t understand a word of the review since I don’t know German (I’m from Poland, don’t blame me :P ), but I’ve read the book in English (you’ve NO IDEA how hard it was to obtain!) and for some reason I didn’t find it boring at all (the description of the spaghettification process got me giggling like mad)… I suppose I’m weird. Or maybe the German translation simply sucks, like Jennifer (42) says. ;)

  50. Pi-needles

    @18. michael Says:

    Uh oh. If one of the amazon reviewers is to be believed the book contains a major translation gaffe: Apparently silicon was consistently translated with „Silikon“ (= “silicone”, the rubber), not „Silizium“ (the element).

    Whoever made that mistake must feel a bit of a boob! ;-)

    (Hey I *can* say “boob” here can’t I? Oh yeah, the boobquake thread .. ;-) )

  51. judy

    @The Mutt No. It translates (back to English :) ) as Death from outer space (universe, in German all means universe or outer space). And the subtitle means How the world will end someday.

  52. ChuckB

    14. Mario Says:
    “Don’t mention the war!”

    “but you started it!”

  53. Ben

    Glancing over this thread again, I have to say that German definitely is a language you are either born with or better off not learning. I gave up on French mainly for its having grammatical genders, and German is far worse… (also, who needs French?? ;) )

    My respect and deeply felt admiration to anyone trying to learn the German language (no matter to what success).

  54. bluebottle

    Sorry to say that, but your flirtation with your lack of knowledge of other languages is as embarrassing as the coquetry of many ‘intellectuals’ with their bad school grades in mathemathics.
    Plus, there are now several translation programs (becoming better every day) on the web which would have allowed you to understand what the German reviews were about.
    To be sure, most EG citizens (with the lamentable British exception) speak at least two languages, and many better-educated Europeans handle three or more tongues. It’s time that you and your American fellow-citizens make some effort. You probably agree with me that this would help to counter national chauvinism.

    I am very surprised that Phil did not find a German speaking collegue to have the German version checked for errors such as silicon vs Silizium/Silikon etc.
    So, in case things went wrong, don’t blame anyone except yourself.
    PS: Otherwise, I adore your blog!

  55. Simon Kregar

    AUFMERKSAMKEIT! What “halbes Gehirn” allowed the sausage eating Bundestag to translate a sensitive subject like the book “DEATH FROM THE SKIES”. DEY GOT STRUDEL EATING MAD SCIENTISTS STILL HIDING EAST OF FRANKFURT AND NORTH OF BERLIN, NO? :)

  56. Ben

    > Sorry to say that, but your flirtation with your lack of knowledge of other languages
    > is as embarrassing as the coquetry of many ‘intellectuals’ with their bad school
    > grades in mathemathics.

    Almost agree.

    Getting to know your way around in other languages can be a rewarding experience. Especially, if you can enjoy person to person contact with someone from the other side. Or want to enjoy their literature.

    There is, however, no inherent benefit from learning many languages. They don’t offer much by themselves, when not put to use in day to day life. I believe the sheer number of different languages hampers communication a lot.

    But neglecting mathematics would be the far greater sin! (After one acquired basic speech.) It’s a whole, different, equally important, enlightening, helpful, and profoundly practical skill set in life. Whereas a third or forth language is only another similar tool in the same box.

    Hence, I frown on the intellectual lazy who does not labor towards speaking a second tongue or, worse, does not do justice to his/her own. But I’m desperately outraged by those who do not work towards a basic understanding of mathematics.

    Language to understand people, mathematics to understand nature.

  57. Actually, in this case, “Silikon” (and not “Silizium”) is correct since there is a death-from-the-skies scenario involving a nice pair:

    http://einestages.spiegel.de/external/ShowTopicAlbumBackground/a10061/l3/l0/F.html#featuredEntry

  58. Nigel Depledge

    Bluebottle (54) said:

    Sorry to say that, but your flirtation with your lack of knowledge of other languages is as embarrassing as the coquetry of many ‘intellectuals’ with their bad school grades in mathemathics.
    Plus, there are now several translation programs (becoming better every day) on the web which would have allowed you to understand what the German reviews were about.
    To be sure, most EG citizens (with the lamentable British exception) speak at least two languages, and many better-educated Europeans handle three or more tongues. It’s time that you and your American fellow-citizens make some effort. You probably agree with me that this would help to counter national chauvinism.

    Ooh, it looks like Phil has touched a nerve here!

    In fact, if you look into it, many USA citizens speak at least some Spanish (y’know, in case they ever need to visit California). Even if Phil were fluent in 4 or 5 languages, he could still be ignorant of German, and I would think no less of him for it.

    As for we Brits, we are spoilt for choice. Most Brits learn sufficient French at school to make a passable effort if they use it regularly; some of us also learn some German at school. But I once worked in an EU-funded consortium involving groups from universities in the UK, Spain, Sweden and Germany. And the only language we had in common? English. Even had I been fluent in German and French, this would not have helped me to communicate with my Spanish or Swedish colleagues. Since there has to be a lingua franca in Europe, why not English?

    The only thing I find objectionable is people who don’t try at all. For instance, I once met an American couple in Florence who were so impressed with my hastily-acquired smattering of pidgin Italian that I assumed it was their first day in Italy. It turned out to be their first day in Florence, but they had previously spent almost a week in Rome, and they had barely progressed to saying “per favore” and “grazie“. I guess you’ll find a similar thing with many Brits in certain parts of Spain.

    And when I visited Sweden, I found it actively challenging to learn any Swedish at all, because everyone used English around me (except when they forgot who I was). I met one Swedish woman whose English was so good that I initially thought she was English.

  59. “Since there has to be a lingua franca in Europe, why not English?”

    There are two problems with this, one easy to solve (in principle, if not in practice), the other difficult to solve. Nevertheless, the de facto lingua franca in Europe (and much of the rest of the world, but by no means all) is English.

    The first problem is that English is relatively difficult to learn. Of course, it is easiest to learn languages related to other languages one speaks, and that will vary from speaker to speaker. However, for the same degree of relatedness, English is difficult, for a variety of reasons (strange spelling, uncommon grammatical constructs, vocabulary from many sources, lack of a standard language in the sense that almost everyone speaks or at least understands it etc). If the idea is to reduce the difficulty in learning the language for those who don’t speak it natively, there are better choices, such as Swedish.

    The second problem is that choosing one language above others implicitly, at least to some people and in some respects (and, to some people, explicitly) involves choosing one culture above others. This can be avoided, in principle, by choosing an artificial language (or avoided somewhat by choosing a dead language). However, this leads to a chicken-and-egg problem, since until a threshold is reached, one has little possibility to actually use the language in the real world.

  60. Robert Carnegie

    “Der All”, pronounced like the first syllable of “Allied victory in Europe” (I’m being very rude), means the cosmos, I suppose. Everything. But what I’m not clear on is who Tod is. This guy? http://www.tods.co.uk/

  61. Pi-needles

    @^ Phillip Helbig : How about Klingon? Or Elvish? Or Navii? ;-)

  62. Mark

    “The first problem is that English is relatively difficult to learn.”

    Nonsense. English may have a uniquely sadistic spelling system, but irregular spelling exists in many languages (or ideograph systems providing no clue to the pronunciation). No nondeliberate language has a perfectly regular grammar or lexicon from a single source. Languages may be standardized within small groups but the larger the group speaking it, the more it diverges around the edges and becomes nonstandard. If the sole criterion in selecting a lingua franca is that it be easy to learn for non-native speakers, then Swedish is no better. Four or five (depending on who’s counting) different classes of regular verbs, inconstant word order? Something tells me you speak a Germanic language as a first language and have not given much though to others.

    If the sole criterion for a lingua franca were the ease with which non-native speakers could learn it, say it’s Esperanto or any of a dozen other languages designed for that and be done with it. Now, realize that that’s not the sole criterion and resign yourself to a lingua franca being the language the largest number of people speak.

  63. Ben

    @Phillip Helbig:

    1.) “The first problem is that English is relatively difficult to learn.” Sorry, but a language not torturing you with grammatical genders is about as easy as it gets. English is compact, and it breaks down to 26 letters without accents or anything. And one of the greatest features: the ubiquity of Hollywood movies, computer games and US television series! Young people want to learn the language as localization inherently offers bad quality.

    2.) “The second problem is that choosing one language above others [...] involves choosing one culture above others.” Sorry, but only small-minded people really believe that. If anyone fails to realize he/she is human first, and his/her cultural background only by chance and interchangeable, they need to broaden their horizons quickly. Conserve it, if you’d like to, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s irrelevant.

    No value judgment is involved here; existing language penetration, market strength and accessibility already create the de facto standard, as you said. And the moment the Chinese take over the world, we will all spin on a dime!

    Personal anecdote: Leaving the German part of the internet behind me, and plunging into the English world wide web, was the best thing I’ve ever done. If I could have it, I’d want a unified world wide language tomorrow.

    Imagine the opportunities.

  64. Nigel Depledge

    Philip Helbig (59) said:

    The first problem is that English is relatively difficult to learn. Of course, it is easiest to learn languages related to other languages one speaks, and that will vary from speaker to speaker. However, for the same degree of relatedness, English is difficult, for a variety of reasons (strange spelling, uncommon grammatical constructs, vocabulary from many sources, lack of a standard language in the sense that almost everyone speaks or at least understands it etc). If the idea is to reduce the difficulty in learning the language for those who don’t speak it natively, there are better choices, such as Swedish.

    OK, others have largely addressed this already, but I’ll add my twopenn’orth:

    IMO, it is not that hard to learn enough English, but it is hard to learn English to a very high standard (to whit: the high proportion of native English-speakers who do not bother). A classic example is the letter grouping “-ough”.

    It can have several different values, depending on context:

    Bough (sounds like “bow”, as in the pointy end of a ship)
    Tough (sounds like “tuff”)
    Though (rhymes with “owe”)
    Through (sounds like “throo”)
    Thorough (sounds like “thurruh”, although I recognise that it often has a value different from this on the western side of the Atlantic)

    The second problem is that choosing one language above others implicitly, at least to some people and in some respects (and, to some people, explicitly) involves choosing one culture above others. This can be avoided, in principle, by choosing an artificial language (or avoided somewhat by choosing a dead language). However, this leads to a chicken-and-egg problem, since until a threshold is reached, one has little possibility to actually use the language in the real world.

    While some others have vehemently rejected this idea, I think there may be something to it. A recent article in New Scientist highlights some research that hints at language shaping our thought patterns. Either way, American culture pervades Europe, in the form of TV shows, soft drinks and fast-food outlets. I don’t know to what extent this has been caused by the use of English, or if it is a cause of the widespread use of English as a second language in Europe.

  65. Ben

    Either way, American culture pervades Europe, in the form of TV shows, soft drinks and fast-food outlets. I don’t know to what extent this has been caused by the use of English, or if it is a cause of the widespread use of English as a second language in Europe.

    It’s caused by largely unhindered lines of communications between Europe and the US, and the fact the US come up with some sexy new stuff! Of course, that becomes adopted. Rarely 1:1, but slightly modified to be thrown in with the rest of the then dominant cultural elements at the receiving end.

    Let’s face it, the US just make the better TV shows. That’s due to the their creation process, and the money behind them. I gladly bin our local ones, which can’t deliver the goods! Soft drinks can be tasty and fast-food outlets are convenient, that’s why they are adopted. And the fact that it’s giants McDonalds and Coca Cola expanding, and not some new local snack bar, well, that’s how open markets work.

    Hollywood is more block-busty than European film, hence it became a hit. If people aren’t in their mindless action flick mood however, they also turn back to intelligent European films.

    Clinging to arduous local customs, when presented with a better way to do things, would be stupid. Put the horse carriage in a museum, if you want to conserve it, but the reason people drive cars is convenience, not foreign cultural domination. We’ll slowly end up in a world-wide cultural hodgepodge, and that’s the right way to go.

    How else would we have it? Separatism? Don’t think distinct cultures can be had, as anything other than fading historical resonances, without fencing off a human ecosystems!

  66. Uhm…wow O_O

    Never thought that my review would be discovered here :D

    I have to admit that I only read the comments up to..uhm…#25 or something like this so I might have missed some points that were mentioned here…

    I really liked the book and gave me some good laughs at certain points. The “it does not include many images/pictures/whatever” was just stating an objetive fact ;) I really dont mind it at all!

    Regarding the presentation: Yes, I was kinda tired that day so please forgive me in that regard.
    Oh…and yes, it WAS my first review and I just looked up some informations about Mr. Plait on Wikipedia (so what)as t was not really designed for a scientific forum of any kind at all (which would require more detailed information, I guess).
    I also just saw it in the bookstore and was like “Hmm…interesting title. Why not give it a try” – and thats basically the reason I did this (attempt of a (?)) review: For people who arent really into scientific topics but are open-minded and eager to learn/discover new aspect of the world and/or universe.

    Even though the web is mostly anonymous it would be nice of everyone to refrain from writing things that are not fully true or just guessed “facts”. ;) As I mentioned before I havent read all of the comments but as far as I could tell the discussion went kinda off-topic and started to go in a direction where civilized people should just stop and think twice about what they want to write…

    So…yeah – I’m still surprised that the “review” got that much attention. And while I’m at it:
    Thanks for the book, Philip! I really liked it (although it does not seem to appear like this)! :)

    Regards
    Tassadar661899

    P.S.: The sheet I held up was basically 10^93 with the red numbers being the time we are in right now – Just to give an impression on how unbelievable huge that number is :)

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