Tag: Chile

Making "Astronomer's Paradise"

By Phil Plait | February 28, 2012 3:59 pm

In early February I posted a gorgeous time lapse video of the night sky in Chile called "Astronomer’s Paradise". One of the astrophotographers who created that video, Christoph Malin, has written an article about what went into making the video, and it’s as complex as you might expect. The article discusses equipment, processing, and the location of the shoot, and yikes, what a haul it must have been! There are gorgeous pictures posted there too, like this one of a laser being used to create an artificial star to improve the telescope’s resolution:

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There are lots more such pictures on Flickr.

I’ll note that Christoph put together a different version of "Astronomer’s Paradise" that has significantly different footage, and it’s well worth your time to watch.

Christoph and Babak Tafreshi are working on Parts 2 and 3. I can’t wait to see them!


Related Posts:

An astronomer’s paradise
Satellite Tumblr

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Astronomy, Pretty pictures

A long, thin, volcanic plume from space

By Phil Plait | July 15, 2011 7:00 am

In Chile, the volcano Puyehue-Cordón explosively erupted in June, sending thick layers of ash to the east over the country and into Argentina. While the activity has died down, an ash plume still flows from the stratovolcano, and was spotted by NASA’s Terra satellite on July 8:

Chile is on the left, Argentina on the right. The image shows a region over 400 km (240 miles) across, giving you an idea of just how long that plume is… and see all that beige covering Argentina? That’s ash. As the wind has shifted the plume has changed direction, covering vast swaths of land with volcanic ash.

NASA’s Earth Observatory has several spectacular images of the eruption seen from space, and The Big Picture has them from the ground.

Credit: NASA images courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center


I’ve collected quite a few images of volcanoes from space into a gallery slideshow. Click the thumbnail picture to get a bigger picture and more information, and scroll through the gallery using the left and right arrows.]

manam_volcano
aqua_iceland_05102010
aster_merapi
eo-1_villarrica
eo1_kizimen_ali
eo1_krakatoa
iss_cleveland
iss_etna_2002
iss_kamchatka
mayon_volcano
soufriere_collapse
tandem_radar_etna
terra_etna
terra_eyjafjallajokull
terra_iceland_volcano
terra_klyuchevskaya
volcano_on_volcano

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Pretty pictures

Magnitude 8.8 earthquake off Chile coast

By Phil Plait | February 27, 2010 9:59 am

Last night at 06:34 UTC, a huge earthquake struck on the coast of Chile, with a reported magnitude of a numbing 8.8 — making it one of the largest earthquakes recorded on Earth since 1900.

A tsunami warning has been issued for the entire Pacific ocean. This is no joke; the tsunami gauges in the deep ocean have registered a wave spreading from the quake. I don’t know how big the amplitude is, but there have been confirmed reports of waves a meter high in Chile. That may not sound like much, but water weighs a ton per cubic meter/yard, so a wave that high has a lot of destructive power.

The tsunami should hit Hawaii around 11:05 local time, and it’s not clear at all how big it will be. In 1960, a larger earthquake happened off Chile and a tsunami hit Hilo, Hawaii causing quite a bit of damage. If you live anywhere near a Pacific coast, please check the local news and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center. Also, a live stream of news from Hawaii is on HawaiiTsunami.com. I’ve been listening and the coverage is pretty good.

If you live in Hawaii, now might be a good time to check out that higher ground you hear so much about. At the very least, stay away from the beaches! People are already starting to evacuate the coasts, so if you choose to get out, the earlier you get moving, the better. Traffic is bound to get snarled. Please please please don’t panic. Stay calm, and keep focused.

It’s unclear if this will be a big wave or not. But if you’re in Hawaii you should consider moving to higher ground.

Here is a map by the NOAA of the modeled energy wave expected from the earthquake:

noaa_2010_quakeenergy

It’s unclear to me just how big a wave this means in terms of real height (it’s a model, not an actual measurement), but it should bring home that you should take this seriously.

I’ll note that the magnitude scale doesn’t translate perfectly to energy released, but roughly speaking an 8.8 quake releases the energy equivalent of 20 billion tons of TNT, or 400 time the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated (Tsar Bomba, a 50 megaton test done by the USSR in 1961). If the measurement hold up, this will be the fifth or sixth strongest earthquake recorded since 1900. The strongest ever recorded, in 1977 1960, was magnitude 9.5, also in Chile — the one that caused the tsunami in Hilo.

Thanks to Sean Carroll for the link to the energy map. Note also, in this post I referred to the Richter scale, which is no longer used. I corrected that.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science
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