Category: Geography

Flowers, Fungi & Felines: An Unusual Epidemic in Brazil

By Rebecca Kreston | October 24, 2014 3:01 pm

Rose-thorn disease sounds like a malady of lovesick teenagers, an illness of romance reserved for budding Romeos and Juliets swooning from their first forays into passion and lovesickness, an affliction arising from the shocking stick and sting of heartbreak. The sweet name of this malady, however, in no way belies the actual crustiness of its symptoms.

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The Fluke That Thwarted an Invasion

By Rebecca Kreston | September 30, 2014 10:00 pm

Microbes are the omnipresent yet frequently unacknowledged adversary on the battlefield. Though microscopic in size, their very macroscopic effects can decimate armies, foil the best planned war initiatives, and change the course of history.
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Obama’s Message to West Africans on the Ebola Outbreak

By Rebecca Kreston | September 14, 2014 5:40 pm

Last week, the State Department performed a small but smart gesture towards countering the continued outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa by releasing a video featuring President Barack Obama speaking to the people of Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Nigeria.

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Heroin’s Anthrax Problem

By Rebecca Kreston | August 30, 2014 12:59 pm

This may come as a total shock, but pure forms of illicit drugs can be hard to come by. Certain controlled substances are frequently adulterated, if not outright contaminated, by products that range from the household to the industrial to the pharmaceutical. Of course, some substances are more easily, frequently, and profitably adulterated than others: cocaine purchased on the retail level is on average 31%, well, not cocaine, while the purity of heroin on the street is even lower, resting around 65% (1).

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Care About Health? Ditch the Bucket & Get Vaccinated

By Rebecca Kreston | August 22, 2014 2:00 pm

Unbeknownst to many of the public, August was National Immunization Awareness Month. I know, I know: it’s been overshadowed by some very exotic and thrilling headliners this month. The Ebola epidemic blazing defiantly in West Africa. The jaw-dropping videos shown on Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week.” The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge clogging everyone’s social feeds. Vaccines are just not as sexy or as flamboyant as these issues. Truthfully, they’re a bit dull to talk about, not a topic you would tend to bring up at cocktail parties or at the water cooler. Read More

On the Road: The Evolution of HIV Along Highway Networks

By Rebecca Kreston | July 31, 2014 1:25 pm

Just as we jetsetters and nomads wander the wide world’s winding roads and byways by foot, on horseback, atop a bicycle or packed into an automobile, so too do infectious diseases make use of our ever-improving networks of thoroughfares. They ride along in human bodies, their journeys fueled by our social mobility and contact, two factors unavoidably intensified anytime we embark upon a voyage. But as these pathogens travel new routes and encounter new bodies, they can change and mutate. Luckily for researchers, by examining commonly traveled routes where we once naively believed that only humans trod, the active evolution and epidemiology of a pathogen can be revealed, providing insight into the development and patterns of disease affecting mankind.

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Crying Wolf: Texan Dogs Used as Sentinels for Chagas Disease

By Rebecca Kreston | July 29, 2014 8:00 pm

In the twentieth century, men toiling in British and American coal mines relied on a primitive alert system for imperceptible dangers: the bright canary bird. Miners toted the caged birds into the depths of the earth to serve as early warnings against poisonous and potentially fatal gas leaks. If the tiny birds suddenly slumped in their cages due to the presence of odorless and colorless carbon monoxide, miners would beat a hasty retreat to safer, cleaner air.

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Microbial Misadventures: Playing With Fire

By Rebecca Kreston | May 26, 2014 11:00 am

“Water-borne pathogen.” Three gut-twisting words with enough power to make any epidemiologist, public health official, or globetrotting tourist double over. One of the most common forms of disease transmission is the microbial hijacking of our most precious fluid. This mechanism of infection is employed by a motley crew of microscopic organisms that have adapted to prey upon our unquenchable thirst, from pervasive bacteria like cholera and typhoid to often less famous but no less formidable parasites such as giardia and dracunculiasis.

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One Parasite’s Rise Amidst the Soviet Union’s Decline

By Rebecca Kreston | April 29, 2014 9:15 am

Ask any political scientist: regime change has unforeseen consequences. The vacuum left in the wake of a collapsing leadership and the disorganization that follows, whether greeted with joy in the case of liberation or fear in the case of tyranny, brings unexpected change. For the central Asian states of the former Soviet Union in the early 1990s, among these aftereffects was the appearance of a curious and frightful little worm that saw, in the collapse of the monolithic political powerhouse, a bright opportunity for itself.

An illustrated map of the republics of the former Soviet Union in the year 1989.

The administrative republics of the former Soviet Union in the year 1989, prior to the independence of Soviet republics following the fall of the Berlin Wall. Image: Perry-Castañeda Library (PCL) of the University of Texas at Austin. Click for source.

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A Reptile Dysfunction: Unlikely Sources of Salmonella

By Rebecca Kreston | March 24, 2014 9:35 am

Salmonella may well be one of the most disreputable microbes in Western society. It’s infamous for its food-poisoning capabilities and has a well known history of wrecking the bonhomous vibe following a good summer barbecue, not to mention its singular ability to cast a sickly shadow over the breathtaking bounty of an all-you-can-eat buffet.

An illustration of a petri dish with red Salmonella bacteria rods.

A gram stain of a species of Salmonella. Image: CDC.

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