Seven citizen science projects to do in the snow!

By Darlene Cavalier | January 4, 2018 4:03 pm
Willy from Philly measures snow precipitation

Willy from Philly measures snow precipitation

Did you know that forecasters rely on YOU to help accurately predict storms, floods, droughts and extreme weather conditions? The National Weather Service, for example, depends on people just like you to report local rain and snow precipitation measurements to a citizen science project known as CoCoRaHS: Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network. Learn more about this long-running, popular project and, when you’re ready to jump in, set up your rain gauge before the next rain or snow storm to collect rain, record measurements, and share data! CoCoRaHS shares the data with scientists, planners, and, yes, the National Weather Service. CoCoRaHS is also a SciStarter Affiliate which means you can earn credit for participation in your SciStarter dashboard. OOOOOOH!

This is one is cool. Simply by Tweeting the precise snow accumulation data where you are, you can help cryosphere researchers calibrate the accuracy of instruments on-board weather satellites orbiting overhead! Those instruments are great at taking pictures and analyzing wide sections of land but they cannot tell the difference between, say, a snow bank and a huge accumulation of naturally falling snow. But you can! Get your ruler, put your warm winter gear on, and head outside to do SnowTweets! Tag @SciStarter and #SnowDay if you decide to do this one and we’ll give you a shout out!

Here are more projects on SciStarter that you can do in the snow!

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Citizen Science
MORE ABOUT: snow, snowday
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Citizen Science Salon, brought to you by SciStarter, is where science enthusiasts can join forces with top researchers. We'll feature weekly collaborative, crowdsourced, and DIY research projects that relate to what you're reading about in Discover, so you can take science into your own hands. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Darlene Cavalier

Darlene Cavalier is the founder of SciStarter and the founder of Science Cheerleader (an organization of more than 300 current and former NFL and NBA cheerleaders who are also scientists and engineers). Cavalier is a founding partner of ECAST (Expert and Citizen Assessment of Science and Technology), currently engaged in a Cooperative Agreement with NASA, a Professor of Practice at Arizona State University’s Consortium of Science, Policy and Outcomes, and a contributing editor at Discover Magazine.

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