The Radical Green Makeover

By Keith Kloor | October 2, 2009 1:11 pm

Interesting headline by Grist.

Once upon a time, radical greens might have been called monkey-wrenchers, bombers, arsonists, whale defenders, even tree-sitters.

Today, if you belong to a green group that is agitating against the congressional climate bill, because you think it’s not strong enough to curb global warming, you might as well be a traitor to the cause. That’s the unmistakable subtext of this Grist story.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: climate change, environmentalism
  • Judy Cross

    It would be hard to understand the role James Hansen is taking, except when you remember Lenin’s remark that the best way to defeat the opposition is to control them.

    Cap and Trade is going to be another deluge of money for what FDR called the Banksters.  Goldman Sachs planned to be the only brokerage house that would be allowed to trade between continental markets…in other words, all carbon trading between North America markets and the rest of the world would be funneled through them, so they collect a commission on each trade.

    BTW, has grist mentioned anything about the latest scandal involving tree core selection and Keith Briffa?

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About Keith Kloor

Keith Kloor is a NYC-based journalist, a senior editor at Cosmos magazine, and adjunct professor of journalism at New York University. His work has appeared in Slate, Science, Discover, and the Washington Post magazine, among other outlets. From 2000 to 2008, he was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine. In 2008-2009, he was a Fellow at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism, in Boulder, where he studied how a changing environment (including climate change) influenced prehistoric societies in the U.S. Southwest. He covers a wide range of topics, from conservation biology and biotechnology to urban planning and archaeology.

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