The Winter that Never Was

By Keith Kloor | March 22, 2012 5:24 pm

That’s the title of my latest post at the Yale Forum on Climate Change & the Media. It’s about the pendulum swings of public opinion (in recent years), their connection to weather, and why this is problematic for journalists and climate communicators.

  • Bob Koss

    Title an article “The winter that never was.”
    Make no mention the title only applies to 2% of the world. 
    Make up a faux title for a Dr. Seuss book “How global warming stole winter” to make appear like the article should apply to what children experienced throughout the world.  Quote an alarmist campaigner as if he presents important insight.Call the public fickle about climate change. When in reality most people rank it so low in importance their life, it’s probably about equal to the importance of the proper way to hang the loose sheet of toilet paper rolls. Near the wall or away from it.Just for some perspective on the winter that never was. It doesn’t even make the top ten warmest globally.http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/

  • Bob Koss

    Arghh. Forgot to double linefeed. Hopefully this is a more readable copy with one added remark. Title an article “The winter that never was.”
    Make no mention the title only applies to 2% of the world. 
    Make up a faux title for a Dr. Seuss book “How global warming stole winter” to make appear like the article should apply to what children experienced throughout the world. Quote an alarmist campaigner as if he presents important insight.Call the public fickle about climate change. When in reality most people rank it so low in importance their life, it’s probably about equal to the importance of the proper way to hang the loose sheet of toilet paper rolls. Near the wall or away from it.Just for some perspective on the winter that never was. It doesn’t even make the top ten warmest globally.http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/No wonder the public has the regard for journalists that they do. 

  • Bob Koss

    Another formating failure, even though there are about 1/2 a dozen double linefeeds inserted.

  • allen mcmahon

    In South Australia we had the summer that never was. Weather is so fickle. Fortunately we have climate models to tells us what to look forward to over the next hundred years or so.

  • BobN

    Keith – Good article and I think it points out a very key problem for those that are climate-concerned – No matter how many times they point out that weather is not climate, people experience the variations in weather and a local or regional level.  Thus, the public’s level of concern will vary with the local/regional variation in the weather they are experiencing.

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About Keith Kloor

Keith Kloor is a NYC-based journalist, and an adjunct professor of journalism at New York University. His work has appeared in Slate, Science, Discover, and the Washington Post magazine, among other outlets. From 2000 to 2008, he was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine. In 2008-2009, he was a Fellow at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism, in Boulder, where he studied how a changing environment (including climate change) influenced prehistoric societies in the U.S. Southwest. He covers a wide range of topics, from conservation biology and biotechnology to urban planning and archaeology.

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