When Will Greens Move on to the Next Cause?

By Keith Kloor | May 17, 2012 1:05 pm

Some time ago, a mischievous person who works in the environmental/science communication sphere brought something to my attention: Laurie David, the producer of Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth documentary, apparently became bored with global warming activism and moved on to a new cause.

Nobody says that green activists should remain tethered to one particular issue. So who knows, maybe it’s better that people don’t turn into one-note drones. (We have enough of them, right?) But I do wonder if there will soon come a point in time when greens and environmental journalists move on to the next big environmental issue of the day. History shows this will of course happen.

In my latest post at the Yale Forum on Climate Change & the Media, I discuss the last headline-grabbing green cause and the dismay by some environmentalists that it has now gotten elbowed off center stage by global warming. In my post, I suggest that the climate cause may soon suffer the safe fate. Have a read and tell me what you think.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: climate change, environmentalism
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Collide-a-Scape

Collide-a-Scape is an archived Discover blog. Keep up with Keith's current work at http://www.keithkloor.com/

About Keith Kloor

Keith Kloor is a NYC-based journalist, and an adjunct professor of journalism at New York University. His work has appeared in Slate, Science, Discover, and the Washington Post magazine, among other outlets.From 2000 to 2008, he was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine.In 2008-2009, he was a Fellow at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism, in Boulder, where he studied how a changing environment (including climate change) influenced prehistoric societies in the U.S. Southwest.He covers a wide range of topics, from conservation biology and biotechnology to urban planning and archaeology.

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