Collide-a-Scape is Moving to Discover Magazine

By Keith Kloor | December 7, 2012 1:13 pm

This is a fun and exciting announcement to make. It’s been nearly four years since I launched Collide-a-Scape midway through my fellowship at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism (CEJ). Initially, I had thought I’d blog on the intersecting cultural/environmental issues specific to the Southwest. Of course, since it was my blog, I had license to share my obsessive fear about lurking mountain lions, too.

But as my dear friend Tom Yulsman predicted, I very quickly veered beyond Colorado to the globally important issues of our day, such as climate change and sustainability. (During my CEJ fellowship, I studied prehistoric climate change and how it affected ancient cultures in the Southwest, a topic I had already written on in the mid to late 2000s.) I’ll be forever grateful for the year I spent in Boulder and to CEJ for supporting my professional and intellectual endeavors during this time. I was afforded the opportunity to step away from the daily editorial grind and enlarge my perspective on a number of topics that have been of long-standing interest to me. That gave me the head space to then explore environmental and science-related issues on this blog. So far, it’s been a great journey.

I’m looking forward to continuing that journey at Discover magazine. I so appreciate them welcoming me into their fold. It’s a great honor to be part of such an illustrious science journalism tradition.

I hope all my faithful readers will join me over there and continue to engage in the kind of spirited debate that has made Collide-a-Scape a vibrant and diverse forum. This blog will migrate fully over to Discover sometime early next week. Please know that Discover’s website has recently undergone a major overhaul. They are still working out the kinks at the new site, so your patience will be much appreciated.

There will be no change in the commenting policy of my blog. However, since a new system has been put in place at Discover, all commenters will have to register for the first time over there. After that, it should be smooth sailing–comments will not be moderated (at my blog) and will appear immediately. (Of course, I will still strive to maintain a civil and respectful tone.) That said, I am unfamiliar with Discover’s new system, so again, please be patient if for some reason your comment is held up in moderation.

Lastly, I want to thank my wife, Ms. Scape, whose enduring patience (which I’ve greatly tested) has allowed me to continue this blog.

Please come join me next week at Discover blogs.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: science journalism
  • Vinny Burgoo

    Congratulations!

  • Mary

    Oh, that’s great news. Will be a nice addition to the set of topics over there.

  • Marlowe Johnson

    say it ain’t so! we fear change…

  • http://ourchangingclimate.wordpress.com/ Bart Verheggen

    Well done, congrats!

  • RickA

    Congratulations.  While more of a lurker than an active commenter, I certainly intend to follow you over to Discover, and continue reading and occasionally commenting.

  • http://3000quads.com/ Tom Fuller

    Well done and congratulations. 

  • Tom Yulsman

    Congratulations Keith! This is indeed awesome news. I really look forward to reading your posts over at Discover. (And btw, it looks like I’ll be joining you over there in the not so distant future.)

  • Jonathan Gilligan

    Congratulations on the prospect of actually getting paid for the work you do as a blogger.

  • Tom C

    Congratulations and thanks for hosting a good blog.

  • Tom Scharf

    Clearly they recognized you attract the best talent to your comments section.

  • BBD

    Congratulations Keith!

  • Joshua

    Congrats, Keith.

    Hopefully at Discover we’ll be able to put freakin’ paragraph breaks in comments?

  • http://thingsbreak.wordpress.com/ thingsbreak

    Who says hippie punching don’t pay? ;)

  • Keith Kloor

    Thanks, all. I look forward to the same level of engagement over there as we’ve had here. I also plan to get back to doing what I did when I was blogging more frequently, which is elevating comments into posts to advance the conversation.

    Look for Q & A’s, book reviews and a whole bunch more, too.

  • http://3000quads.com/ Tom Fuller

    How about a series of interviews with movers and shakers?

  • http://3000quads.com/ Tom Fuller

    And to elaborate, invite them to stick around and share in the commenting…

  • steven mosher

    Ya Keith, elevating comments to posts is a great idea. Back in the old days at slate, hanging out with Glen Reynolds before he was instapundit, all the commenters worked really hard to say things that would get them ‘elevated’. Glen, of course, was tough competition and eventually moved on to start his own gig. Be careful, you might create a monster.

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Collide-a-Scape

Collide-a-Scape is a wide-ranging blog forum that explores issues at the nexus of science, culture and society.

About Keith Kloor

Keith Kloor is a NYC-based journalist, a senior editor at Cosmos magazine, and adjunct professor of journalism at New York University. His work has appeared in Slate, Science, Discover, and the Washington Post magazine, among other outlets. From 2000 to 2008, he was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine. In 2008-2009, he was a Fellow at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism, in Boulder, where he studied how a changing environment (including climate change) influenced prehistoric societies in the U.S. Southwest. He covers a wide range of topics, from conservation biology and biotechnology to urban planning and archaeology.

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