Salon: Not All Conspiracy Theories are Crazy

By Keith Kloor | January 23, 2013 1:16 pm

When is a conspiracy theory outright loony tunes and when is it borderline acceptable for rational discussion? Salon has an interesting measuring stick. Earlier this month, the site treated the vile Sandy Hook Truthers with proper WTF contempt.

But perhaps in the interest of (false?) balance, Salon also suggests in a piece posted yesterday that 9/11 Truthers shouldn’t be put into the same batshit bin as the Sandy Hook Truthers. In case you’re not sold, there’s some discussion of the JFK assassination.  And a parting recommendation that even Alex Jones should not always be dismissed out of hand. Yeah, you read that right.

The piece prompted an incredulous tweet from Zach Beauchamp:

Conspiracy theorists are a fascinating (and, as with the Sandy Hook Truthers, repelling) breed. That’s why they make for good film and television. Do some of the more outrageous tales they peddle make for legitimate journalistic inquiry? Salon seems to think so.

UPDATE: Well, on closer inspection, maybe not. Slate reports that Salon has pulled the piece.

 

CATEGORIZED UNDER: conspiracy theories, select, truthers
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About Keith Kloor

Keith Kloor is a NYC-based journalist, and an adjunct professor of journalism at New York University. His work has appeared in Slate, Science, Discover, and the Washington Post magazine, among other outlets. From 2000 to 2008, he was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine. In 2008-2009, he was a Fellow at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism, in Boulder, where he studied how a changing environment (including climate change) influenced prehistoric societies in the U.S. Southwest. He covers a wide range of topics, from conservation biology and biotechnology to urban planning and archaeology.

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