A New Low for Dr. Oz: Promoting Mike Adams

By Keith Kloor | May 13, 2014 3:17 pm

Unlike some in the science blogosphere, I haven’t found it worthwhile to write much about Mike Adams, whose conspiracy-laden screeds and paeans to raw foods and unproven alternative medicine treatments appear on a website of his called Natural News. (I have briefly discussed Adams on one previous occasion.) Here’s an apt description from David Gorski:

His website is a one-stop shop, a repository if you will, of virtually every quackery known to humankind, all slathered with a heaping, helping of unrelenting hostility to science-based medicine and science in general. True, Mike Adams is not as big as, say, Joe Mercola, whose website, as far as I can tell, appears to draw more traffic than NaturalNews.com, but what Adams lacks in fame he makes up for in sheer crazy.

That is no exaggeration. Mark Hoofnagle calls him

a deranged individual who denies HIV causes AIDS, promotes some of the most absurd quackery in the world, and also is such an all around crank you can rely on him to wax conspiratorial about almost any dramatic news story.

For example, here he is on Alex Jones’s uber-conspiracy show, talking about the “zombiefication of America.”

Jon Entine at the Genetic Literacy Project writes that Natural News “is the cyberspace version of the water cooler gathering spot for crackpot conspiracy theorists of the far left and right.” Entine ticked off some choice samples of the crazy:

In recent months, Adams has claimed that high-dose Vitamin C injections, which he conveniently sells, have been shown to “annihilate cancer” (doctors warn high doses of vitamin C can be dangerous); that measles and mumps are making a comeback because vaccines are “designed to fail” (he’s an anti-vaccine campaigner); and that fluoridated water causes mental disorders. He is also an AIDS denialist, a 9/11 truther, a Barack Obama citizenship ‘birther’ and a believer in ‘dangerous’ chemtrails.

But hey, apparently nobody is too crazy to appear on the Dr. Oz show. Last year, a New Yorker profile of Oz by Michael Specter asked:

Is the most trusted doctor in America doing more harm than good?

I think the answer to that is now self evident.

UPDATE: It turns out that Mike Adams is threatening to sue Jon Entine and Forbes, where that article had appeared.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: alternative medicine, science
  • GingahBeahd

    weird thing is, in my lifetime, i’ve yet to hear a ‘conspiracy theory’ that hasn’t come to light as true or at least been documented and buried. ill have to keep my eye on him. thanks!

    • scifan

      Conspiracy theory: all conspiracy theories are a hoax designed to keep you from knowing the truth. So now I guess you’ll have to revise that first statement….

    • RealityCheck131

      Um, ok. Yeah man, every conspiracy theory is true. You got it figured out.

  • mem_somerville

    Ya know, I was just thinking about that today. I was reading a storify where a bunch of bio/med/sci writers were chatting about how to cover stuff. And they were thinking hard about the appropriate ways to do stuff–with things like context, depth, and appropriate levels of hype (or, pouring cold water on hype), etc.

    http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/13/the-problems-of-health-journalism-storify-ed/

    But it strikes me that no matter what quality writers will do, there are “aggressive misinformers” I’ve started calling them. There are more people who are slick, offer simple answers, and can’t be bothered with actual facts or statistics at all. And they aren’t just wrong, they’re dangerously fictional.

    I’m getting really tired of being told that scientists are such #scicomm #fail, when there’s no way to compete with the megaphone that these aggressive miscreants have, amplified by every social media strategy out there. No matter how effective a scientist or science writer is going to be, I can’t believe we’re losing to these guys (to paraphrase an SNL skit).

    • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com Keith Kloor

      I saw that piece and am going to be writing a related post touching on the theme.

      • mem_somerville

        (I acknowledge your upcoming work–glad to hear it–and continue to rant anyway…)

        And what bugs me about the scicomm advice we are hearing from professional scicommers is that it presumes that we are on an even floor in this arena. But we aren’t. It’s already been twisted and distorted by this force field. So it’s not like we can start by expecting to give “Info 101″ on whatever science topic, in a gentle and inviting manner to a large audience. We have to unlayer copious piles of manure first, all of which was watered from the spring of Conspiracy Theory.

        My favorite description of that was a while back–Mike the Mad Biologist called it the The Asymmetric Advantage of Bullsh-t.

        I know you know this, and have tackled it first hand–that Indian Suicide stuff was a solid case of that.

  • bobito

    I wish I lacked the moral fiber that keeps me from making a living by duping dumb people. It must be easier than contributing something meaningful to society…

  • Ian

    the ‘conspiracy theorist’ label is losing its stigma. i prefer ‘critical thinker’. hell, ill claim the title of conspiracy theorist proudly any day of the week.

    • RealityCheck131

      Conspiracy theorists are usually the complete opposite of critical thinkers.

      • Ian

        not true at all most conspiracy theorists are not tin foil hat wearers.

        • RealityCheck131

          I guess you can just keep saying that, but it doesn’t make it true.

          • Ian

            how would you know if it is true is isnt?

          • RealityCheck131

            Ok, I’ll rephrase that. People giving credence to lots of conspiracy theories and claiming they are true on comment boards all over the internet without any evidence are generally the opposite of critical thinkers. However, I’ll agree with you that you would probably find a lot of people that think there is something to at least one conspiracy theory.

          • Ian

            now we’re talking my friend! just remember theres a lot of knowledge and information out there (on the net) and it can be extremely overwhelming to the average human which is why you get the stereotypical tin foil hat wearing hillbilly.

          • Ian

            best way i find to take in overwhelming information is to unplug from technology and get out in nature for a while preferably next to naturally running water.

  • Hello

    This article is uncalled for. I’ll admit that Mike Adams is very opinionated and is not afraid to speak his mind. But this situation is completely different. He bought all the expensive laboratory equipment necessary to test different food samples for heavy metal contaminants. This situation is not quackery, but scientific testing. He even checked his results with other other labs who also tested the same foods. Dr. Oz had him on his show for a reason. Not to promote Mike Adams in general, but to discuss how some of our food, especially food from heavily polluted China, is so contaminated with heavy metals, it is toxic. When you have a statement backed by scientific evidence it cannot be called quackery.

    • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com Keith Kloor

      Trust Adams to do unbiased scientific testing–based on his track record?

      Oz giving Adams this network TV platform confers legitimacy on him to unsuspecting millions. It’s beyond irresponsible.

      • Hello

        Dr. Oz has been interested in heavy metal contamination for a while now. He has brought consumer reports on show before regarding this topic. They found the same thing Mike Adams did-that a lot of the protein powders are contaminated with heavy metals. He has also cited other studies showing how polluted China is in terms of its soil and water, which do not contradict his discoveries.

        • Science Mom

          Hello, what makes you even think that Mike Adams has the expertise to even run his equipment? Don’t you think that’s kind of important?

          • Hello

            It’s not that hard to get training to run scientific equipment. There are lots of programs that specialize in training lab technicians or specialists.

          • Science Mom

            Sure there are and they take years of intensive training and experience but Mike Adams have never availed himself of them. Not to mention there is the no-small-detail regarding calibration and maintenance of equipment which he doesn’t know how to do and then there is the actual education and experience to run scientific experiments and know how to interpret results.

          • Hello

            He’s just collecting data not really conducting an experiment. He’s just measuring heavy metal levels. And if you have a BS, which Mike already has, it’s really not that hard to get lab training. I’m not talking about getting a PhD or conducting new experiments to measure whatever is being researched. He’s using a standard method to measure heavy metal levels, the results of which he has verified via other labs who also tested the same products. I’m sure anyone can learn one easy lab technique well and do it over and over again to create a database on foods.

          • Science Mom

            Mike brags that he is conducting “PhD level food forensics”. Lowly techs get their direction from experienced supervisors. Mike is a cowboy and while yes, he’s operating at a level even beneath a tech, he’s claiming he’s conducting research. That requires protocols and publishing and knowing how to use your equipment, just a BS in something isn’t adequate. His “research” has not been validated by other labs either. Feel free to cite the published results however.

          • Hello

            I don’t support a lot of what Mike says or does. I know he has a big opinion, a big mouth, and a big head. That being said, I don’t see why people are against him spreading the word that some foods are contaminated with heavy metals, He sent samples ot other labs to validate his results. I’m not sure if he published them because I don’t follow him closely. That being said, even if he hasn’t, people can just ask him to. Like I said before, consumer reports has also confirmed that protein powders with rice protein powder from China are contaminated. Just go to their protein powder section. For some techniques you might need more expertise. And yes, even PhDs will call in an expert in a certain technique when they are not that skilled in it. But for the particular techniques he’s using it’s not the case.

          • Science Mom

            You claimed his ‘research’ was valid because he had independent verification. If you aren’t prepared to provide that then you’ve put yourself in an indefensible position. Consumer Reports uses proper labs and accepts no commercial funding. Mike sells his own line of supplements and other garbage, not exactly an independent reporter now is he? You don’t seem to know much about Mass Spec do you if think he doesn’t require education and experience to do what he’s doing. Here’s a hint, it’s not like in CSI where you put a sample of something in a blinky box, push some buttons and get your result.

          • Hello

            There are classes just on MS that I’m sure he could take. My point was that you don’t need a PhD to use lab techniques not that you don’t need any training at all. I said his research was valid because Consumer Reports had similar results and because of all the pollution reports coming out on China. My point that he verified his results with other labs was more that he could verify for himself that he was performing all the laboratory techniques correctly.

          • August Pamplona

            So, in other words, he has no independent verification?

          • Hello

            On the faq page of the site, he says “We do, however, encourage companies to engage in the following process:

            Test the heavy metals concentrations of your own products using a qualified laboratory. Be sure to test every production lot, not just a single lot.

            Publicize the level your products meet, if you wish, and voluntarily LINK to this website to describe the details of the level. (We will create a list on this site of companies which are voluntarily citing these standards.)

            Create your own artwork, if you wish, to communicate this to your customers.

            We would like to explore a way to allow companies to use these logos but we haven’t yet developed a method which would reliably prevent fraud attempts by some companies which operate with low integrity. As a result, we currently allow no use of these logos as we cannot 100% validate the heavy metals concentration of every production lot without engaging in very expensive, routine testing of every production lot.”

            In other words, this is just the beginning of this project and maybe in future there will be data from other labs who doing similar work and are willing to publish free of charge.

            You can also take one of the products he tested and test it yourself to check if his results are accurate..

          • August Pamplona

            I’ll take that as a “yes, thought I’ve intimated otherwise, he has no independent verification”.

            In other words, what you are telling us is that we should take him seriously because he *might* have conducted the testing properly.

            Of course, he might also have chosen to disseminate reliable information in the past but he hasn’t (whether it is because he outright lies or because he is exceptionally incompetent matters not). I do not think that taking him seriously based on the possibility that he might act honestly and competently this time around is a good way to proceed.

          • Hello

            You can take who ever you want seriously. I am only saying why I believe him in this case. Until there is data contradicting him, personally, I’m going to believe him for now. Everyone has a right to their own opinions and decisions; I’m just stating mine, which is one viewpoint among many other viewpoints.

          • Science Mom

            “There are classes just on MS that I’m sure he could take.”

            But he hasn’t; he has arrogantly proclaimed that he can do anything a PhD scientist can do. There is also that not-so-small matter of knowing how to calibrate and maintain your equipment. That he also doesn’t know the first thing about.

            “My point that he verified his results with other labs was more that he
            could verify for himself that he was performing all the laboratory
            techniques correctly.”

            Again false. He hasn’t verified jack with any other laboratories and is orders of magnitude off of other readings. Do you understand what verified and validates means? Kind of important.

          • Hello

            If you go on the lab website, he actually says he calibrates so he has at least heard the term. I’m going to use one of your previous argument in this case. You have no proof that he did not calibrate, get training in MS or anything else you are stating is factually false.

            The video clip did say that when certifying organic, companies have to do their own heavy metal testing. So it was recommended that people call the product companies themselves to check if the product is high in heavy metals. That is one way to verify whether his results are true or not.

          • Science Mom

            “If you go on the lab website, he actually says he calibrates so he has
            at least heard the term. ”

            Comforting. And that’s your defence for him actually doing it? I trust that you don’t know much or anything about the importance of keeping instrumentation properly calibrated. No problem, neither does Mike.

            “I’m going to use one of your previous argument
            in this case. You have no proof that he did not calibrate, get training
            in MS or anything else you are stating is factually false.”

            Mike Adams does not have any training whatsoever in conducting MS experimentation nor maintaining his equipment. Where are his degrees/certifications and published results which would provide the parameters of his experiments along with the type of equipment used? He brags about how awesome he is, surely it isn’t consistent to leave all of his quality education and publications off of his website. If he has certification as he claims to have (he doesn’t) then he would have to have maintenance logs. He doesn’t. He’s just another snake-oil salesman who craves legitimacy and envies education.

          • Symea Rosales

            His Resume says “a degree from a college.” –“A” college? what you can’t name it? His bio is written (by him you can tell) in the third person. creepy and starts with “mike Adams was believed to be born…” believed to be born? it’s insane

          • Viva La Evolucion

            When they introduce him on Dr. Oz show they say that he has an organic certification lab. and their call to action is to have the FDA and food manufacturers test products for heavy metals.

          • Science Mom

            And I have a dragon who lives in my garden. What is your point?

          • Viva La Evolucion

            My point is that the dragon living in your garden has not prompted food manufacturers to being testing their foods for presence of heavy metals, but Mike Adams, crazy as he may be, did succeed in doing that.

          • Science Mom

            But Mike Adams doesn’t put his results through rigorous peer-review so we can determine if his methodology is sound and results valid. Oddly, in spite of your claim that he is the only one testing foods for “heavy metals”, I can find copious studies and press releases of manufacturers, watchdog and oversight organisations doing that for several years now.

        • mem_somerville

          Can you show us one of his peer-reviewed publications on this data?

          • Hello

            Mike cited news reports, which in turn cited the study/report released by the Chinese government. The only problem is that the original reports are in Chinese so you’ll have to use google translate or something. Here’s the news article on the soil: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-27076645. Here’s the original report on the soil: http://www.mep.gov.cn/gkml/hbb/qt/201404/W020140417558995804588.pdf. You can go on google scholar and find a lot of articles on China and the pollution of its soil and water if you want. I think for the consumer reports lab info on protein powders you have to pay for a subscription or something. I remember they offered a free 24 hour subscription to dr. oz viewers at the time the show was aired.

          • mem_somerville

            Yeah, Mike’s grasp of citation and evidence has not been so good in the past. How is his Chinese? I’m not familiar with his fluency there. How is yours?

            “Just google it” is a pretty pathetic answer usually given by people with no grasp of the topic, I’m afraid.

          • Hello

            I used google translate and it worked just fine. I actually typed in china and pollution in google scholar myself and saw lots of articles on the severity of pollution in China going years back before I ever told you to use google scholar yourself. There are lots of articles to look at if you are interested. It is commonly accepted now that China is way too polluted and has effects on health. Even my sister mentioned she heard it in school, and she’s majoring in toxicology.

          • RealityCheck131

            I take it you believe in chemtrails and are against vaccines?

          • Hello

            I haven’t read or researched much about chemtrails. I don’t even know what they are to be honest. As for vaccines, I like the idea of vaccines a lot. Unfortunately, the reality is vaccines don’t work the way we would like them to and have risks that are overlooked or ignored by society.

          • RealityCheck131

            Vaccines do work as we would like them to, unless you are saying you’d like them to magically have no rare side effects. The risks of vaccines are well-known and studied. Nobody is overlooking or ignoring them. We just realize that the very rare instances where there are side effects to a vaccine are outweighed by the enormous benefit to society as a whole. Perhaps you should cite a source for your claim that vaccines “don’t work the way we would like them to”.

          • Hello

            Well maybe they work the way you want them to but not the way I want them to. I don’t want aluminum injected straight into my body with no mucus barrier to help control absorption. I don’t want poliovirus from oral poliovirus vaccine to mutate, as viruses often do under evolutionary pressure, and cause poliovirus outbreaks that vaccines can’t protect against. I want the measles vaccine to work even in third world countries where measles is most detrimental and where malnourished children do not have the building blocks for the vaccine protect them, which leaves them with the negative “side effects”. I want the pertussis vaccine efficacy to last more than 3 years in a country where the vaccine is only prescribed every 10 years. etc etc.

          • RealityCheck131

            Oh, I thought you meant you had actual reasons for why we shouldn’t use vaccines, rather than just a wishlist for how the world could be a better place. The amount of aluminum in vaccines is tiny and harmless. If you have a study showing it’s not, please provide it. By far, the biggest problem with disease in third world countries is that vaccines are not used enough, not that they don’t work.

          • Hello

            Here are some studies about aluminum.

            Aluminum toxicokinetics regarding infant diet and vaccinations

            http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X02001652

            Systemic immunotoxicity reactions induced by adjuvanted vaccines

            http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1567576914000873

            Aluminum Exposure and Metabolism

            http://informahealthcare.com/doi/pdf/10.3109/10408369709006422

          • RealityCheck131

            None of those studies make any claims that the amount of aluminum in vaccines is a significant health risk. The first one clearly states that the amount is below the minimal risk level.

          • Hello

            what? I’m not sure you read the articles. The first one said that after vaccination, plasma aluminum levels rise rapidly and spike at an alarmingly high concentration, which causes concern. The authors said that the plasma levels did eventually level off over time to the amount below their defined minimum risk level. The authors where concerned about repeated vaccinations causing repeated damage when they spike to that high plasma level.That being said, where did the aluminum go after plasma levels normalized? Was it all secreted? Hence, I linked the third article on aluminum metabolism, which describes how aluminum is not all secreted but accumulates in tissues. The second article was about the immunotoxicity of aluminum from vaccines.

          • Hello

            A lot the vaccines in third world countries don’t work because of malnourishment. In order for vaccines to work, antibodies against the pathogens needs to be induced in significant enough levels so as to help better deal with disease upon exposure. With malnourishment, a lot of people in third world countries are just so low in protein they don’t have the amino acids to build adequate stores of antibodies, hence, the vaccines don’t work. Vaccines will never work as long as there’s world hunger. Thus, the idea that measles, for example can be eliminated if enough people are vaccinated doesn’t make sense. If people were well nourished in the first place, with a stronger immune system, they also wouldn’t be as vulnerable as much to measles, for example.( In the US 1 person in 1000 cases of measles die, while in third world countries that number is much higher.)

          • Hello

            I’m not joking about the mutate poliovirus from oral vaccines infecting people in third world countries. I just typed in vaccine derived poliovirus on google scholar and got tons of hits. http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=vaccine-derived+poliovirus&btnG=&as_sdt=1%2C5&as_sdtp=
            I know it’s third world countries, but with international travel of food and people, every one can be affected. We’re not isolated populations anymore.

          • JakeCTexas
          • RealityCheck131

            Humphries is a homeopathic quack with no qualifications to be making any claims about vaccines. When typing in a person’s name on google gives you the suggestion to add “quack” at the end, you might wanna try a new source.

        • Jose Falck Zepeda

          Illuminating critique by Orac at Respectful Insolence on the so called Forensic Lab owned by Mr. Adams…illuminating indeed…http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2014/02/21/mike-adams-the-yoga-mat-chemical-and-the-chemical-apocalypse/

    • scifan

      Hi, have you read this article by Mike Adams, in which he claims humans can live off of just sunlight and water simply by staring directly into the sun? Do you really still think this guy is credible? Anyone?

      http://www.naturalnews.com/024256_sun_gazing_food_life.html

      • Hello

        I don’t agree with what a lot of Mike Adams says. I mean this guy does publish just about anything on his website. That being said, Mike did not write that particular article and it is dated 2008. Just like a lot of opinionated thinkers Mike changes his from year to year as he learns more.

        • scifan

          I will have to see some actual studies from Mike Adams in order to believe his claims. If you can link me to anything, anything at all, that would allow me to compare his actual data against other scientists’ data, that would be great — indeed, comparison and replication are the foundation of the scientific method. As a fan of science, I think any responsible consumer should be asking whether Mike Adams is actually conducting science or conducting fearmongering in order to promote his own products. Evidence: at the end of an article published just yesterday, Adams writes:

          “The lesson in all this is that the protein product marketplace contains both clean and contaminated proteins.
          “Your job is to learn to tell the difference, and my job is to run the lab tests that empower you with those answers.
          “The best way you can help support me in this effort is to share this story and spread the word. If you wish, you can also become a customer of the Natural News Store, the only retailer in the world that tests everything we sell for heavy metals.”
          (from http://www.naturalnews.com/045108_vegan_proteins_heavy_metals_laboratory_test_results.html)

          Adams says it himself: his goal is to motivate consumers to reject other products and buy his own. He even says he needs the financial support of fans like you. Why do you believe this guy is actually conducting science when he himself all but admits he’s just selling protein powder?

          • Hello

            You don’t have to buy his products. Personally, I have never bought any of his products and don’t have any plans to. I just know keep in mind to avoid food products with rice sourced from China.

            Yes, Mike Adam’s is business man. Just like the dairy industry funds studies promoting drinking milk for bone health and the fishing industry promotes fish oil supplements for cardiovascular health. Unfortunately, we live in a world where money and scientific research are hard to separate but that doesn’t mean we can’t learn from anything they do or say.

    • RealityCheck131

      Why not just bring some random housewife on the show to do some scientific testing then? Ridiculous. This guy has zero qualifications and a past history of dangerous quackery. Dr. Oz giving this nut a platform deserves ridicule.

      • Hello

        Mike Adams was brought on the show because he is the one who is doing the testing and trying to spread the word. If a scientist somewhere was doing the same thing he would probably have ended up on the show. I watch Dr. Oz pretty frequently and he brings all sorts of people on the show with all sorts of viewpoints on all sorts of different topics. Sometimes those people agree, sometimes they contradict each other, and sometimes they complement each other.

        • RealityCheck131

          This cracked me up. “Testing” from an unqualified hack is not something anyone should be using to make health decisions.

    • lilady R.N.

      Adams has poised himself as a science researcher and appears to have purchased some expensive lab equipment. Does he have a degree in lab sciences? Does Adams have any degree from a university…not a diploma mill?

      • Hello

        I know he has a BS. Don’t know what else he has. You’ll have to ask him.

        • lilady R.N.

          His own 3rd person account about his academic credentials from his own Health Ranger website:

          BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

          “Mike Adams is the best health and natural products writer on the scene today.”

          – Ronnie Cummins, founder, Organic Consumers Association

          Adams is believed to have been born in 1967 in Lawrence, Kansas. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from a university in the Midwest. In college entrance exams and graduate school entrance exams, Adams scored in the 99.9th percentile across all U.S. students. He is known to have aced the English, Mathematics and Science sections of the SAT,
          earning numerous offers of scholarships from various universities, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (which he chose not
          to attend).”

          Heh, heh…just a crank bullsh!t artist who has no undergrad or graduate degrees.

          • Symea Rosales

            ….., “oh, thank you, a full ride to M.I.T.??..ummm….ya know what? I think I’ll pass, I don’t want to get too genius or anything.” —incredible

          • lilady R.N.

            I actually have a BSc-Nursing degree and I know how to draw blood for a variety of tests (easy if you look at the laboratory ordering sheet which directs you to use the proper specimen tube). I know how to do nasal, nasopharyngeal and vaginal swabs for PCR testing and DNA fingerprinting and I’m smart enough to know what I don’t know, about laboratory technology. :-)

      • Symea Rosales

        he won’t say from ‘where” but he does add that he did very well on entrance exams and that he can solve the Rubik’s cube.—straight from his Bio. read it thoroughly – and laugh
        http://www.healthranger.com/Health-Ranger-Biography.html

    • Symea Rosales

      he rents the lab, he’s not a scientist, he fails to mention naturally occurring metals in plant life that is food based and flushes out, he’s a megalomaniac that is very misinformed on many subjects, Dr. Oz’s minions did not research him well. It is frightening.

      • Hello

        He does have opinions on many subjects that I don’t agree with but the idea that high levels of heavy metals from polluted soils is being absorbed by certain types of crops, which are consumed by us and acting as toxins is commonly accepted.

    • Kongming Hy

      Well said

  • Jordan

    Keith wow… what was the point of this article? Adams has found some interesting and shocking things related to heavy metals in foods. He’s using lab equipment to test popular food brands. Where is the conspiracy? It’s either in there or not. Worst article I’ve read all day.

    • scifan

      Hi there, do you or any other readers have links to Adams’ published studies or to the studies conducted by other labs? As a fan of science, I’m afraid I cannot simply take your or Adams’ word for it.

    • RealityCheck131

      He’s also found some interesting chemtrails in the sky. Do you agree with him? Have you spent money on his web site?

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  • Lee Wickman

    If the frothing demagogues at Discover are against Oz, he must be doing something right

    • http://HealthNutNews.com/ HealthNutNews.com

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  • Skeptico

    A lot of defenders of Mike Adams here, for some reason. Mark Hoofnagle called it correctly: Adams is a nut whose main aim is to sell you food supplements. (Funny how that conflict of interest doesn’t raise any red flags among his supporters.) Anyway, nice summary, Keith. The people who defend Adams need to wake up.

    Orac wrote about this today: America’s quack: Dr. Mehmet Oz.

  • Dred Locks

    This article did not make sense. He found a problem and reported on it. So what if you dont agree with him? The point is his research sound or not? I think it is or many would not making an effort to fix their products. Stop hating and look beyond that to see the issue at hand. In other words, look at problem not at the person who said it.

    • Ian

      ad hominem means you have no argument and all youve got is down talking the person because their ideas are irrefutable.

      • Dred Locks

        If you say so sir. I was not down talking. I was saying we need stop focusing on the person and focus on the problem because focusing on taking what someone is saying personal or disregard what they say because of their character is not wise. get over it. what he is saying on dr oz is big problem. if you dont agree, fine, continue as is.

        • Ian

          we are completely on the same page you have misconstrued my comment im sorry i didnt clarify enough, had you googled ad hominem or understood what ad hominem means in latin you would understand what i mean and that i agree with you 100%. when you have no argument and all you do is down talk the person making the argument that called ad hominem. i for one was thrilled to see mike adams on dr oz. natural remedies are how we defeat big pharma

          • Dred Locks

            My bad. I am also sorry. I should have looked it up :)

          • Ian

            hey man its as easy as a right click and a quick search to find out just about anything! its quite a time we are living in the internet is a double edged sword of tyrannical surveillance and renaissance art literature and philosophical knowledge :) personally i think a solar flare knocking the human race back to the stone age would do us all some good.

      • Viva La Evolucion

        So, let’s say that Keith Kloor was unhealthily overweight and out of shape. Would it be ad hominem to say that one should not take Keith Kloor’s food advise due to him being fat and unhealthy? On the other hand, Dr. Oz is quite fit for his age, so would it be ad hominem to say that it is wise to take his diet and lifestyle advise, as it seems to be working out well for him?

        • Ian

          You know something, thats a very good question. “Ad hominem reasoning is not always fallacious, for example, when it relates to the credibility of statements of fact.”
          I guess the answer is, I am not sure, I dont know.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad_hominem

  • lilady R.N.

    Good grief…has Dr. Oz sunk so low to have the Health Deranger snake oil salesman on his show?

    It is so sad to contemplate how Dr. Oz, who at one time, was a respected heart surgeon, has dug a huge rabbit hole for himself to climb into. Such is the life of “celebrity doctor” on a TV show

    • Viva La Evolucion

      Yes, Adams is a nut, and yes he gives some crazy advise, but Dr Oz didn’t have him on the show for his crazy advise, he had him on the show because he is the one who used lab testing to discover the fact that there heavy metals in many organic foods. I think Keith would have been more effective in promoting his GMO/Herbicide loving cause if he would have wrote an article saying that due to Adams testing many organic foods have been found to have high levels of heavy metals, which does not exactly make them safer than their conventional counterparts. Isaac Newton was a religious nut, who tried to extract scientific information from the bible to figure out when the world would end…Does that mean we have gone to a new low if we believe he made important contributions to science?

  • Howard

    Dr Oz cannot possibly go lower. He makes Mike Adams seem like Ralph Nader and Albert Einstein rolled into one perfect human.

    Mike Adams appears to have many kooky opinions. However, that is not evidence that he is wrong about heavy metals in foods. Heavy metals in plant derived supplements are no surprise to anyone working in the environmental profession. Phytoremediation is a tool we use to remove heavy metals from soils. Any concentrated plant derived superfood or nutrient product can have heavy metals from natural and man-made sources. Since these products may come from the developing world, do the math. Only an idiot would use supplements or food concentrates. It’s safe to assume they are all potentially mutagenic or toxic unless they are Swiss or German.

    • Jerry A

      Did you know Mike Adams sells many of these so-called “superfoods” and supplements? Did you know that Adams claims his competitor’s supplements are filled with toxic heavy metals, while his own products are clean? That’s called “undisclosed conflict of interest”. This should disqualify him from making these claims without independent verification.

      Did you know that you can’t just open a user manual and start running tests on an ICP-MS? It takes very extensive and expensive training, which Adams does not have. Adams claims to have earned a ‘science’ degree, but does not disclose what type or from which school. (Adams only previous “science” work was in computer science doing programming.) I run a different type of MS at work and train PhDs but even I would not sit down in front of an ICP-MS and start using it. Adams is counting on public ignorance of science, and you are falling for it. This does disqualify him from making these claims, especially without independent verification.

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Collide-a-Scape

Collide-a-Scape is a wide-ranging blog forum that explores issues at the nexus of science, culture and society.

About Keith Kloor

Keith Kloor is a NYC-based journalist, and an adjunct professor of journalism at New York University. His work has appeared in Slate, Science, Discover, and the Washington Post magazine, among other outlets. From 2000 to 2008, he was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine. In 2008-2009, he was a Fellow at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism, in Boulder, where he studied how a changing environment (including climate change) influenced prehistoric societies in the U.S. Southwest. He covers a wide range of topics, from conservation biology and biotechnology to urban planning and archaeology.

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