Crank up your word processors

By Sean Carroll | January 25, 2006 2:13 pm

I’m sure we have a slew of budding Pynchons and Stoppards out there in the CV audience. Here’s your chance to break into the big time: the Second Annual Seed Magazine Fiction Supplement.

In the June/July issue Seed will publish its Second Annual Fiction Supplement. We are not looking for traditional Sci-Fi — we are looking for fiction that reflects the significant role science plays in our culture; fiction that uncovers the rich narratives in science; and fiction wherein scientists are fallible and human. We are looking for Science-In-Fiction, Fictional Science and Scientific Fiction — in the tradition of Andrea Barrett, Richard Powers, Margaret Atwood and Alan Lightman, writing that brings new meaning to our understanding of Science Fiction.

Scientists are fallible and human? Sorry, can’t help them there. Remember, if anyone who reads this post goes off and writes a story that gets into the magazine, we want to hear about it.

Update: Apparently we’re talking about an entire genre of fiction here — LabLit. (Via grrlscientist.)

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science and Society, Words
  • http://www.erectlocution.com/boxing/ Daniel

    It’s quite too easy to breed a phantasm with lasers and nanotechnology. Poor characterization can easily be thrust behind a wall of Technicolor buffoonery. This sort of machining of fiction from a world definitively affected by its scientific imagination falls under mundane science fiction.

    As I’ve been trying to rekindle my writerly bits, maybe I’ll submit something that doesn’t suck too much.

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Cosmic Variance

Random samplings from a universe of ideas.

About Sean Carroll

Sean Carroll is a Senior Research Associate in the Department of Physics at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include theoretical aspects of cosmology, field theory, and gravitation. His most recent book is The Particle at the End of the Universe, about the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the Higgs boson. Here are some of his favorite blog posts, home page, and email: carroll [at] cosmicvariance.com .

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