Tag: psychology

Why Does Time Seem to Fly as We Get Older?

By Christian Yates, University of Bath | August 11, 2016 12:55 pm
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(Aleksandar Mijatovic/Shutterstock)

When we were children, the summer holidays seemed to last forever, and the wait between Christmases felt like an eternity. So why is that when we get older, the time just seems to zip by, with weeks, months and entire seasons disappearing from a blurred calendar at dizzying speed?

This apparently accelerated time travel is not a result of filling our adult lives with grown-up responsibilities and worries. Research does in fact seem to show that perceived time moves more quickly for older people making our lives feel busy and rushed. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts

The Psychology of Pokémon Go Haters

By Carl Engelking | July 15, 2016 2:25 pm
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(Credit: Niantic)

When Psy’s “Gangnam Style” broke YouTube, they refused to give it a single view.

When people soaked themselves during the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, they called it a waste of water.

When Pokémon Go took the United States by storm after its release July 6, they went out of their way to tell friends, family and social network followers they would never play the game. They encouraged pocket monster trainers to grow up, pursue gainful employment or just get off their lawns. One writer, Mattie Lou Chandler, was compelled to publish “A Hater’s Guide to Pokémon Go.” Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts
MORE ABOUT: psychology

Does Evidence Support the Artistic vs. Scientific Mind Stereotype?

By David Pearson, Anglia Ruskin University | April 21, 2016 12:10 pm
artistic-scientific-mind

(Credit: Bulatnikov/Shutterstock)

It’s a stereotype, but many of us have made the assumption that scientists are a bit rigid and less artistic than others. Artists, on the other hand, are often seen as being less rational than the rest of us. Sometimes described as the left side of the brain versus the right side – or simply logical thinking versus artistic creativity – the two are often seen as polar opposites.

Neuroscience has already shown that everyone uses both sides of the brain when performing any task. And while certain patterns of brain activity have sometimes been linked to artistic or logical thinking, it doesn’t really explain who is good at what – and why. That’s because the exact interplay of nature and nurture is notoriously difficult to tease out. But if we put the brain aside for a while and just focus on documented ability, is there any evidence to support the logic versus art stereotype? Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts

Mindfulness in the Military

By Ella Xiong | April 14, 2016 3:17 pm
military-minfulness

(Credit: S-F/Shutterstock)

Sprinkling “Omm” mantras between “Ooh Rah!” battle cries can pay dividends for members of the Marine Corps and other branches of the military. According to a growing body of research, regular meditation improves the wellbeing of military members — both active duty and those who have previously served.

Meditation is rooted in spirituality, which affects personal wellness in its own way, but the neurological underpinnings of meditation’s other health benefits are being widely assessed by researchers, and they’re building a scientific case for its benefits. Read More

Is Seasonal Affective Disorder a Myth?

By Hugh Middleton, University of Nottingham | February 9, 2016 6:01 pm
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(Credit: Stephen Harlan/Flickr)

A flurry of newspaper headlines have called into question the existence of SAD, or Seasonal Affective Disorder. Scientists, they reported, appear to have debunked a widespread conviction, that feeling low in winter time is a genuine illness caused by disturbed levels of brain chemicals and that demands treatment.

A visit to any number of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) websites leads to online questionnaires offering “diagnosis”, treatment recommendations, and advertisements for light boxes – gadgets that simulate daylight and compensate for poor exposure to the real thing. SAD is identified as a form of depression caused by disturbances of hormonal rhythms sensitive to daylight, primarily melatonin. Unusually, intense exposure to artificial light often is advocated as a treatment. There is even a device that can be worn on the head, allowing the patient to use a light box on the move. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts

Decision Hacks: The Neuroscience of Making Smarter Choices

By Ben Thomas | January 15, 2016 11:49 am
decision_making

(Credit: Ollyy/Shutterstock)

Have you ever walked out of a store with a shiny new gadget and wondered, “Why did I buy this? I can’t afford it. I don’t need it. What made me buy it?” Maybe you’ve asked yourself similar questions after you broke your diet with a tempting dessert, or fell back into the arms of someone who broke your heart: “I knew I shouldn’t have done this. Why can’t I make smarter decisions?”

Neuroscientists have studied questions like these for decades, and they’ve produced a wealth of answers, as well as some tips to catch yourself in the midst of self-deception. Here are three simple ways to avoid deceiving yourself, and turn bad decisions into learning experiences. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts

The Limits of Fight-or-Flight Training

By Ben Thomas | January 5, 2016 11:30 am
fight-or-flight

(Credit: Adam Ziaja/Shutterstock)

The soldiers at Checkpoint 56 ordered the woman to stop.

She was Palestinian, the soldiers were Israeli, and this checkpoint divided the Israeli and Palestinian-controlled sections of Hebron on the West Bank. The checkpoint’s metal detector had gone off when the woman walked through. The soldiers ordered her to raise her veil. She refused.

Then she pulled a knife. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts

How Terrorist Attacks Influence Mental Health

By Daniel Antonius, The State University of New York | December 4, 2015 11:26 am
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A growing body of research examines the psychological aftermath of terrorist attacks, such as the coordinated attacks in Paris on Nov. 13. (Credit: Stacey Newman / Shutterstock.com)

On November 13 2015, a series of coordinated attacks in Paris left 130 people dead. A week later, armed gunmen stormed a hotel in Mali, seizing hostages while also firing indiscriminately at guests, killing 27 people. And this week a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, left 14 dead. While the motive is not known, the FBI has assigned counterterrorism agents to the case, sparking public speculation that the shooting may have been an act of terrorism.

You could spend hours every day watching, reading and listening to news related to these events. This level of exposure can significantly influence your worldviews and how you live your life. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts
MORE ABOUT: psychology

The Psychological Benefits of Thanksgiving Rituals

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(Credit: Brian Chase/Shutterstock)

When Americans gather together around a table groaning with favorite dishes on the fourth Thursday of November, what are we doing beyond filling our bellies with turkey and pie? We convened four experts in the psychology of family traditions and shared meals for a roundtable discussion about what ritual means in the context of Thanksgiving. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts
MORE ABOUT: psychology

The Brain Has a Blind Spot for ‘Unknown Unknowns’

By Rob Brotherton | November 17, 2015 9:00 am

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A conspiracy theory is an invitation to an exciting alternative reality where nothing is quite as it seems. There is fun to be had defying conventional wisdom, sifting through signs, uncovering lost knowledge and secret plots. But we don’t generally believe stuff just for the fun of it. For us to really believe something it has to seem plausible.

How can we be so sure that our journey off the intellectual beaten path and down twisting trails of conspiracy theory has led us to the truth, while the scientific mainstream is deluded or deceptive? Sometimes all it takes is our own overly optimistic brain telling us we understand the world in far greater depth than we actually do.

Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Mind & Brain, Top Posts
MORE ABOUT: psychology
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