Your Weekly Attenborough: Euptychia attenboroughi

By Nathaniel Scharping | March 30, 2018 4:12 pm
Euptychia attenboroughi. (Credit: Andrew Neild, Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London)

Euptychia attenboroughi. (Credit: Andrew Neild, Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London)

Small, spotted and dun

flash of wings in the Amazon sun.

Cloaked in mystery until 2015

Euptychia attenboroughi does not mean to be seen.

Plucked from tangles of jungle undergrowth

to a pin-speckled board, the lepidopterist’s oath.

Attenborough’s black-eyed satyr,

a forest god, a butterfly, it doesn’t really matter.

Black spots spark fear when danger’s near

or just sow confusion, it’s not quite clear.

Its range is limited, the numbers may be low

so keep an eye out wherever you go.

Stumble across a satyr, either today or tomorrow

and you’ve got yourself a real-life Attenborough.

 

Find out more in ZooKeys.

Bonus Attenborough Fact of the Week: 

A young Sir David supplied newts to his father’s university for three pence. The source? A pond right behind the zoology building.

Last week’s Attenborough: Microleo attenboroughi

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Living World, top posts
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