NCBI ROFL: Salmonella excretion in joy-riding pigs

By ncbi rofl | March 17, 2009 6:13 pm


Selected excerpt from the Materials and Methods:
“The plan was to select a part of a group of pigs approaching the age of slaughter. Our knowledge of the Salmonella content of the ingredients of the feed would lead us to consider that these pigs were being fed salmonellae. Using rectal swabs, we would examine this group of pigs on the farm and find their salmonellae excretion rate by this method. We would then take a truck that had been cleaned and made free from salmonellae, and load these pigs upon it as if they were going to be slaughtered. However, rather than taking them to slaughter, we would give them a joy ride through the countryside and end the trip, not at the slaughter-house but back at their home farm. We would examine them again at this time because, if the experiment had been successful, the pigs would have had a similar stress situation to pigs bound for slaughter. We then intended to repeat this experiment on the same pigs at a later date, but this time deliver them to slaughter.”

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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