NCBI ROFL: Swearing as a response to pain.

By ncbi rofl | August 12, 2009 5:51 pm

“Although a common pain response, whether swearing alters individuals’ experience of pain has not been investigated. This study investigated whether swearing affects cold-pressor pain tolerance (the ability to withstand immersing the hand in icy water), pain perception and heart rate. In a repeated measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to repeat a swear word versus a neutral word… …Swearing increased pain tolerance, increased heart rate and decreased perceived pain compared with not swearing.”

Thanks to Helen for today’s ROFL!

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, Uncategorized
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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing").Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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