NCBI ROFL: Boys and girls, please open your textbooks to page 69…

By ncbi rofl | October 22, 2009 3:00 pm

The Dr. Fox effect: a study of lecturer effectiveness and ratings of instruction.

“Students viewed one of six lectures which varied only in substantive teaching points (content) covered and seductiveness. These 207 students then rated the effectiveness of the presentation (satisfaction ratings) and completed a 26-item achievement test. Students who viewed high seduction lectures performed better on the achievement test than did students who viewed low seduction lectures. Similarly, students who viewed lectures high in content performed better on the cognitive test than did students who viewed low-content lectures. The relationship between staisfaction ratings and student achievement was not perfect. Students gave higher ratings to seductive lectures. However, ratings reflected differences in content-coverage only under low seduction conditions. The ratings were not sensitive to variations in content-coverage when lectures were highly seductive. The “Doctor Fox Effect” appears to be more than an illusion. Seductiveness affects both student ratings of instruction and achievement.”

Thanks to Kate for today’s ROFL!

  • Alex Palazzo

    Note the typo: staisfaction

  • Megan

    So the students do better but the prof gets fired for wearing inappropriate clothing?

  • Keenan

    Uh, if you actually read any of the paper, it becomes clear that this is NOT about sexual seduction. They say: "High seduction behaviors included enthusiasm, humor, friendliness, expressiveness, charisma, and personality." So they just chose the easily misconstrued word "seductive" to mean "superficially interesting and entertaining".

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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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