NCBI ROFL: Hijacking a plane flown by euthanized pigs: a beginner's manual.

By ncbi rofl | November 10, 2009 4:00 pm

Use of a pig model to demonstrate vulnerability of major neck vessels to inflicted trauma from common household items.

“Commonly available items including a ball point pen, a plastic knife, a broken wine bottle, and a broken wine glass were used to inflict stab and incised wounds to the necks of 3 previously euthanized Large White pigs. With relative ease, these items could be inserted into the necks of the pigs next to the jugular veins and carotid arteries. Despite precautions against the carrying of metal objects such as knives and nail files on board domestic and international flights, objects are still available within aircraft cabins that could be used to inflict serious and potentially life-threatening injuries. If airport and aircraft security measures are to be consistently applied, then consideration should be given to removing items such as glass bottles and glass drinking vessels. However, given the results of a relatively uncomplicated modification of a plastic knife, it may not be possible to remove all dangerous objects from aircraft. Security systems may therefore need to focus on measures such as increased surveillance of passenger behavior, rather than on attempting to eliminate every object that may serve as a potential weapon.”

  • Vyapada

    Thankfully, security policy on things like these are often driven by fear and paranoia, not consistency or logic.
    After all, people with a high level of martial arts skill should be on the no-fly lists too as they are likely to be more dangerous than a plastic knife… keys are probably pretty dangerous too!


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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl


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