NCBI ROFL: "Back and forth forever" (or, DIY poop therapy).

By ncbi rofl | February 4, 2010 7:00 am

3155783018_fdaf220ca1Success of self-administered home fecal transplantation for chronic Clostridium difficile infection.

“Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can relapse in patients with significant comorbidities. A subset of these patients becomes dependent on oral vancomycin therapy for prolonged periods with only temporary clinical improvement. These patients incur significant morbidity from recurrent diarrhea and financial costs from chronic antibiotic therapy. We sought to investigate whether self- or family-administered fecal transplantation could be used to definitively treat refractory CDI. We report a case series (n=7) where 100% clinical success was achieved in treating these individuals with up to 14 months follow up.”

poop_back_and_forth

Thanks to Caryn for today’s ROFL!
Photo: flickr/★Debs★

And in case you didn’t get our title reference:

Related content:
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: One rat, one cup.
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Rectal impaction following enema with concrete mix.
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Rectal oven mitt.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: ha ha poop, NCBI ROFL, Scat-egory
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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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