NCBI ROFL: Hmmm…what should we call this new butt rash?

By ncbi rofl | February 8, 2010 7:00 am

2266999137_e3fb0334abBaboon syndrome

“Andersen et al described baboon syndrome in 1984. It was characterized by a clinical presentation of systemic contact dermatitis with pruritic and confluent maculopapular light-red eruption, localized in the gluteal area and the major flexures, developed several hours or days after drug or agent contact. This syndrome has a pathognomonic distribution but its cause has not been elucidated yet. Histopathology of the lesions shows non-specific features of dermatitis. Several drugs have been previously described as responsible for the Baboon syndrome origin. Mercury is the most frequent implicated agent; other agents are nickel, different antibiotics, heparine, aminophylline, pseudoephedrine, terbinafine and immunoglobulins.”

baboon_syndrome

Love is in the air this week at NCBI ROFL!  Tuesday-Thursday this week, we will feature research articles about love in its most physical form (ok, we mean plain ol’ sex).  Enjoy!

Image: flickr/mixlass

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Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Finally, science brings you… the pimple detector!

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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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