NCBI ROFL: No bra + Wringer washing machine = squished boob.

By ncbi rofl | May 18, 2010 7:00 pm

REA_washing_machine_with_wringer The Wringer washing machine: an unusual cause of breast trauma.

“A 66-year-old woman… …sustained a left-breast injury with a wringer washing machine. While manually feeding clothes through the rollers of her wringer washing machine, her left breast was drawn into the rollers when her blouse became entangled with the clothing she was wringing. The patient was not wearing a brassiere. Her husband immediately responded to her cries for help by disconnecting the electricity to the washing machine and pressing the emergency release for the rollers. This washing machine was immediately discarded.”

washing machine

Related content:
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Vacuum cleaner injury to penis: a common urologic problem?
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Bonus double feature: Acute management of the zipper-entrapped penis.
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Rectal oven mitt.

WTF is NCBI ROFL? Read our FAQ!

  • Glenn

    “her blouse became entangled with the clothing she was wringing.”
    The fact that: “The patient was not wearing a brassiere.” is irrelevant, unnecessary , … but titillating, I guess

  • jcm

    One more reason to wear a bra!

  • Flying Orca

    I wonder whether there’s a connection to an old family saying, perhaps somewhat common in New England, along the lines of “I haven’t had this much fun” (or “there hasn’t been this much excitment”, or whatever) “since Grandma caught her tit in the wringer.”

    No foolin’.

  • John

    Just downloaded the article… it had pictures. Wish I hadn’t downloaded the article.

NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

Discoblog

Quirky, funny, and surprising science news from the edge of the known universe.

About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

ADVERTISEMENT

See More

ADVERTISEMENT
Collapse bottom bar
+

Login to your Account

X
E-mail address:
Password:
Remember me
Forgot your password?
No problem. Click here to have it e-mailed to you.

Not Registered Yet?

Register now for FREE. Registration only takes a few minutes to complete. Register now »