NCBI ROFL: 'Lager, lager shouting': the role of music and DJs in nightclub disorder control.

By ncbi rofl | September 13, 2010 7:00 pm

285672542_5b122987c7_o“This paper explores how music and music genre can govern the nightlife experience, specifically how a nightclub’s music policy can impact on clientele, health behaviours, bar sales and levels of disorder. Participant observations were conducted in sample of eight city centre nightclubs in Glasgow, Scotland. Music policy was found to influence nightclubs’ clientele and their behaviours, for example in relation to differences in levels of alcohol or illegal drug use, sexual activity and violence between venues. Further, within individual venues, music policy was also observed operating as a crowd control tool, with for example such entertainment being used in alcohol marketing, in ‘soft policing’ and in the temporal management of patrons’ movements. This research acknowledges the centrality of the DJ in implementing these controls. It is clear that music is a central component of the Nighttime Economy. Despite this, to date music has tended to play ‘second fiddle’ to sex and drugs within Club Health research. From this research it is recommended that music policy be incorporated into responsible bar server training packages.”

music_night_clubs

Photo: flickr/PresleyJesus

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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