NCBI ROFL: Homicide attempt with a Japanese samurai sword.

By ncbi rofl | November 23, 2010 7:00 pm

sword“The use of Japanese swords for homicidal attempts is rare. A Japanese samurai sword is a sharp and cutting object. When faced with the use of this weapon, one must distinguish between stabs and incised wounds. Incised wounds can rarely lead to death, but because of the size of the weapon, stabs usually cause much more serious injuries. Stabs also imply a penetrating movement, whereas incised wounds can be the consequence of protective circular blows. Therefore, it is important to distinguish clinically between these two kinds of wounds. We report a case where the perpetrator argued he had given a circular blow, unfortunately hitting the victim. The pieces of evidence are discussed.”

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samurai

Photo: flickr/artr

Related content:
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Why it’s so hard to intercept a ninja.
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Sword swallowing and its side effects.
Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Oral malodor and related factors in Japanese senior high school students.

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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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