NCBI ROFL: Interracial relationships: solved!

By ncbi rofl | January 11, 2011 7:00 pm

Anthropometry of love: height and gender asymmetries in interethnic marriages.

“Both in the UK and in the US, we observe puzzling gender asymmetries in the propensity to outmarry: Black men are more likely to have white spouses than Black women, but the opposite is true for Chinese: Chinese men are half less likely to be married to a White person than Chinese women. We argue that differences in height distributions, combined with a simple preference for the husband to be taller than the wife, can help explain these ethnic-specific gender asymmetries. Blacks are taller than Asians, and we argue that this significantly affects their marriage prospects with whites. We provide empirical support for this hypothesis using data from the Millennium Cohort Study. Specifically, we find that ethnic differences in propensity to intermarry with Whites shrink when we control for the proportion of suitable partners with respect to height.”

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Photo: flickr/Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

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  • Matt B.

    Once you go tall, race don’t matter at all.
    Once you go short, race ain’t your prior’t’.

  • cgauthier

    You know, I hate to say it, but those results seem to match racial stereotypes regarding the height (and girth) of a certain body part perfectly.

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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