NCBI ROFL: Groundbreaking study proves it's hard to see in the dark.

By ncbi rofl | January 31, 2011 7:00 pm

Recognizing faces in bright and dim light.

“32 undergraduates viewed 10 photographs of faces for 3 sec. each in a brightly or dimly illuminated room. Then they viewed 40 photographs in the same light, including the original 10, and identified each photograph as new or old. Subjects recognized significantly more photographs in the bright illumination condition, possibly because that condition allowed for more processing of information.”

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Photo: flickr/spacepleb

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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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