NCBI ROFL: Study proves driving like an old person is contagious.

By ncbi rofl | February 15, 2011 7:00 pm

Nonconscious activation of an elderly stereotype and speed of driving.

“Under the guise of evaluating a head-up display in a driving simulator, 11 participants (5 men), ages 21 to 35 years, completed scrambled-sentence tasks (while waiting at stop signs) designed to prime an elderly stereotype. Each driver completed both the Elderly Stereotype and Control conditions with order counterbalanced across participants. Further, order of presentation of word sets for each trial was random. Driving speed and driving time between stop signs in the Elderly Stereotype condition were compared to the Control condition in which nonspecific age words were substituted for elderly stereotyped words. Participants showed lower maximum speed and longer driving time in the Elderly Stereotype condition than in the Control condition, even though participants reported no awareness of the theme in the experimental condition.”

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Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: Humor and death: a qualitative study of The New Yorker cartoons (1986-2006).

WTF is NCBI ROFL? Read our FAQ!

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, old-skool
  • http://discovermagazine.com Iain

    So? What were the words and let’s expunge them from the English vocabulary.

  • Old Rockin’ Dave

    Have they tested it in reverse? Do geezers drive better after “youthful” words?

  • http://www.cctvchat.com/forum.php Larry Torres

    I really like your blog on cctv systems. Please keep this great information coming.

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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