NCBI ROFL: The science of door-holding etiquette.

By ncbi rofl | October 17, 2011 7:00 pm

Etiquette and effort: holding doors for others.

“Etiquette, the customary code of polite behavior among members of a group, provides a means of conveying respect for others, but what is the basis for etiquette’s unwritten rules? Here we show that one form of etiquette, holding a door open for another person, reflects the door holder’s expectation that the person for whom he or she holds the door shares the belief that the total effort expended by the two of them will be less than the summed efforts of the two individuals acting on their own. Our observations extend recent work on effort reduction in motor control to the management of social interactions.”

Photo: flickr/randychiu

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WTF is NCBI ROFL? Read our FAQ!

CATEGORIZED UNDER: analysis taken too far, NCBI ROFL
  • http://www.catherineblakeney.com Catherine Blakeney

    And here I always thought it was because it isn’t nice to let a door slam in someone’s face.

  • Georg

    I used to work in a lab whose door was located at the end of a long
    (longer than civil engeneering codes allowed!) stair.
    If someone followed on that stair, we would keep the door open
    of course, when the person (preferably older, esp. a boss) was still
    about in the middle of the stair. :=)
    Everybody started running upstairs!
    Georg

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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