NCBI ROFL: Shopping cart etiquette triple feature.

By ncbi rofl | November 28, 2011 7:49 pm

It’s Trinkaus week on NCBI ROFL! All this week, we’ll be featuring articles by John Trinkaus, whose work gives us “an informal look” at many aspects of everyday life. Enjoy!

Clearing the supermarket shopping cart: an informal look.

“An informal enquiry of the behavior of 500 supermarket shoppers clearing carts of litter prior to entering the store showed that 69% dumped the rubbish into another cart, 26% dropped it on the sidewalk, and 5% deposited it in a trash container.”

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Disposing of the empty shopping market cart–an informal look.

“An informal enquiry suggested that only about one out of five shoppers, when finished using shopping carts, returned them to a designated depository.”

Compliance with the item limit of the food supermarket express checkout lane: another look.

“A total of 68 15-min. observations of customers’ behavior at a food supermarket suggests that only about 7% of shoppers observe the item limit of the express lane. The averages tended to be about four pieces.”

Photo: Flickr/Lisa Newton

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CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, trinkaus week
  • Tyler Miller

    PubMed made a typo on the last entry, the real paper reads as follows: “A total of 68 15-min. observations of customers’ behavior at a food supermarket suggests that only about 7% of shoppers observe the item limit of the express lane. The overages tended to be about four pieces.”

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About ncbi rofl

NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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