NCBI ROFL: If I'm not hot, are you hot or not? Physical attractiveness evaluations and dating preferences as a function of one's own attractiveness.

By ncbi rofl | December 16, 2011 7:00 pm

“Prior research has established that people’s own physical attractiveness affects their selection of romantic partners. This article provides further support for this effect and also examines a different, yet related, question: When less attractive people accept less attractive dates, do they persuade themselves that the people they choose to date are more physically attractive than others perceive them to be? Our analysis of data from the popular Web site http://HOTorNOT.com suggests that this is not the case: Less attractive people do not delude themselves into thinking that their dates are more physically attractive than others perceive them to be. Furthermore, the results also show that males, compared with females, are less affected by their own attractiveness when choosing whom to date.”

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  • http://twitter.com/LibraChronicles Libra Chronicles

    Interesting, because if you read between the lines this article may suggest that one of the age old theories that looks matter less to women and more to men may be false.  

    The suggestion is that women are MORE preoccupied by their own looks, while men aren’t so much.  If that’s the case it could be logical to suggest women are more focused on looks overall in themselves and their mates.

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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