This Scientist Endures 15,000 Mosquito Bites a Year

By Veronique Greenwood | April 27, 2012 1:35 pm

The things we do for science.

Researchers who study mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects sometimes use themselves as skeeter chow. In some cases, it’s because certain species of mosquitoes seem to prefer human blood to animal blood. In others, though, it’s a cheap, convenient alternative to keeping animals around for the insects to feed on or buying blood. And as it turns out, once you’ve been bitten a certain number of times you develop a tolerance to mosquito saliva.

Entomologist Steve Schutz, seen above paging through a magazine while the bloodsuckers go to work on his arm, feeds his mosquito colony once a week. He has welts for about an hour, but after that the bites fade, occasionally leaving a few red spots. That’s good, because at 300 bites a week, he averages about 15,000 a year. That’s dedication.

  • Anonymous

    Well when you really think about it, that makes a lot of sense.
    Gotta-Be-Anon.tk

  • mercirani

    Is this called dedication?

    • http://mosquitobitestreatment.com/ Rosalinda

      Definitely! Have to respect him for his dedication and passion to sacrifice for the others. He is even reading magazines while the mosquitoes are sucking his blood lol. Thanks Dr. Schutz!

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