NCBI ROFL: Bobcats eating cadavers. Now THAT's science.

By ncbi rofl | July 19, 2012 7:00 pm

Scavenging behavior of Lynx rufus on human remains during the winter months of Southeast Texas.

“Animal-scavenging alterations on human remains can be mistaken as human criminal activity. A 32-day study, documenting animal scavenging on a human cadaver, was conducted at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas. A Stealth Cam Rogue IR was positioned near the cadaver to capture scavenging activity. An atypical scavenger, the bobcat, Lynx rufus, was recorded feeding on the cadaver. Scavenging by bobcats on human remains is not a predominant behavior and has minimal documentation. Scavenging behaviors and destruction of body tissues were analyzed. Results show that the bobcat did not feed on areas of the body that it does for other large animal carcasses. Results also show the bobcat feeds similarly during peak and nonpeak hours. Understanding the destruction of human tissue and covering of the body with leaf debris may aid forensic anthropologists and pathologists in differentiating between nefarious human activity and animal scavenging.”

Bonus table from the full text:

Photo: flickr/goingslo

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Discoblog: NCBI ROFL: On the explosion of carcasses.

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  • Rebecca Price

    This is really clever, a lot of people worked really hard on this research. I don’t see anything funny about it. Thanks for the hard work at STAFS, keep it up guys! 

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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