NCBI ROFL: Sampling the fried-chicken-ome.

By ncbi rofl | January 15, 2013 2:44 pm

A nationwide sampling of fast-food fried chicken: starch and moisture content.

“A nationwide sampling plan was executed to estimate the nutrient composition of fast-food fried chicken in the United States. Ninety-four composite samples were selected from major chains in 10 cities. Starch contents were determined using a modified American Association of Cereal Chemists method. The amount of glucose formed during enzymatic hydrolysis was quantified either by a gas-liquid-chromatographic or a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique. The starch content ranged from 6% to 13% (wet weight basis). Moisture was determined by both microwave and vacuum oven methods; levels ranged from 38% to 49%. Analysis of variance for both starch and moisture indicated that starch was significantly (p less than .01) higher for light cuts than for dark cuts across all brands. Extra crispy recipes were significantly higher in starch than other recipes. Light cuts were significantly (p less than .01) lower in moisture than dark cuts. In addition, significant differences existed among brands. However, no significant difference was found between samples within a brand obtained from the five regions.”

Photo: flickr/jetalone

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NCBI ROFL is the brainchild of two Molecular and Cell Biology graduate students at UC Berkeley and features real research articles from the PubMed database (which is housed by the National Center for Biotechnology information, aka NCBI) that they find amusing (ROFL is a commonly-used internet acronym for "rolling on the floor, laughing"). Follow us on twitter: @ncbirofl

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