Category: BMJ week

NCBI ROFL: Sword swallowing and its side effects.

By ncbi rofl | May 28, 2010 7:00 pm

spacing is important Fig 1: One of the authors (DM)
swallowing seven swords.

It’s BMJ week (again) on NCBI ROFL! After the success of our first BMJ week, we decided to devote another week to fun articles from holiday issues of the British Medical Journal. Enjoy!

“OBJECTIVE: To evaluate information on the practice and associated ill effects of sword swallowing. DESIGN: Letters sent to sword swallowers requesting information on technique and complications. SETTING: Membership lists of the Sword Swallowers’ Association International. PARTICIPANTS: 110 sword swallowers from 16 countries. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL, super powers

NCBI ROFL: Origins of magic: review of genetic and epigenetic effects.

By ncbi rofl | May 27, 2010 7:00 pm

potterbookIt’s BMJ week (again) on NCBI ROFL! After the success of our first BMJ week, we decided to devote another week to fun articles from holiday issues of the British Medical Journal.  Enjoy!

“Objective: To assess the evidence for a genetic basis to magic. Setting: Harry Potter novels of J K Rowling. Participants: Muggles, witches, wizards, and squibs. Interventions: Limited. Main outcome measures: Family and twin studies, magical ability, and specific magical skills. Results: Magic shows strong evidence of heritability, with familial aggregation and concordance in twins. Evidence suggests magical ability to be a quantitative trait. Specific magical skills, notably being able to speak to snakes, predict the future, and change hair colour, all seem heritable. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL, super powers

NCBI ROFL: Head and neck injury risks in heavy metal: head bangers stuck between rock and a hard bass.

By ncbi rofl | May 26, 2010 7:00 pm

headbangingIt’s BMJ week (again) on NCBI ROFL! After the success of our first BMJ week, we decided to devote another week to fun articles from holiday issues of the British Medical Journal.  Enjoy!

“OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risks of mild traumatic brain injury and neck injury associated with head banging, a popular dance form accompanying heavy metal music. DESIGN: Observational studies, focus group, and biomechanical analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Head bangers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Head Injury Criterion and Neck Injury Criterion were derived for head banging styles and both popular heavy metal songs and easy listening music controls. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL, ridiculous titles

NCBI ROFL: Study proves chocolate bars different from bones.

By ncbi rofl | May 25, 2010 7:00 pm

It’s BMJ week (again) on NCBI ROFL! After the success of our first BMJ week, we decided to devote another week to fun articles from holiday issues of the British Medical Journal.  Enjoy!

Accuracy of comparing bone quality to chocolate bars for patient information purposes: observational study

“Within our area of practice relating to osteoporosis and fragility fracture we have noticed a tendency to compare normal, healthy bone to the finely honeycombed structure of a Crunchie (Cadbury Trebor Bassett; Bournville, Birmingham) chocolate bar and to compare abnormal, osteoporotic bone to the coarser structure of an Aero (Nestle UK; York) bar.  Although this explanation is readily appreciated by patients and clinicians it struck us that the comparison may not be completely valid as no work has been published on the fracture potential of each bar… To enable us to provide accurate data to our patients we studied the fracture risk for each chocolate bar.

choco_bar_dropped_bone

Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, eat me, NCBI ROFL

NCBI ROFL: A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, Jar Jar Binks had a fungal infection.

By ncbi rofl | May 24, 2010 7:00 pm

jarjarIt’s BMJ week (again) on NCBI ROFL! After the success of our first BMJ week, we decided to devote another week to fun articles from holiday issues of the British Medical Journal.  Enjoy!

Tokelau on Naboo

“Tinea imbricata, a superficial fungal infection of man, has an ornate appearance composed of concentric circles and polycyclic or serpiginous scaly plaques. The condition is common in several humid tropical regions, especially in parts of Polynesia and Melanesia. It is also reported occasionally in the Amazon basin and other tropical areas in both hemispheres. The precise distribution of tinea imbricata, however, has been poorly defined ever since the disease was named by Sir Patrick Manson, the father of tropical medicine.

I report the possible presence of tinea imbricata outside its previously known geographic and taxonomic distribution. Several Gungan inhabitants of Naboo, a planet of the Galactic Republic depicted in Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace, have skin with the distinctive annular and polycyclic pattern of tinea imbricata. Jar Jar Binks, a Gungan who figures prominently in this movie, shows this eruption in figure ​2. Manson wrote of the infection, “Again, tinea imbricata, if it has been in existence any length of time, involves a very large surface, as an entire limb, or side of the trunk, or oftener still, if not checked, nearly the whole surface of the body . . . As advancing rings spread, their regularity is modified by the shape of the parts, the nature of the skin they travel over, and by encountering other systems of rings.”… Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL

NCBI ROFL: The case of the disappearing teaspoons.

By ncbi rofl | February 18, 2010 7:00 pm

teaspoonsThe case of the disappearing teaspoons: longitudinal cohort study of the displacement of teaspoons in an Australian research institute.

“OBJECTIVES: To determine the overall rate of loss of workplace teaspoons and whether attrition and displacement are correlated with the relative value of the teaspoons or type of tearoom. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Research institute employing about 140 people. SUBJECTS: 70 discreetly numbered teaspoons placed in tearooms around the institute and observed weekly over five months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of teaspoon loss per 100 teaspoon years and teaspoon half life. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL, rated G

NCBI ROFL: Did Gollum have schizophrenia or multiple personality disorder?

By ncbi rofl | February 17, 2010 7:00 pm

A precious case from Middle Earth.gollum

“Sméagol (Gollum) is a single, 587 year old, hobbit-like male of no fixed abode. He has presented with antisocial behaviour, increasing aggression, and preoccupation with the “one ring.”… …His forensic history consists of Deagol’s murder and the attempted murder of Samwise Gamgee. He has no history of substance misuse, although like many young hobbits he smoked “pipe weed” in adolescence. Sméagol has forgotten many memories of his childhood, and we have limited collateral history on his premorbid personality. Before obtaining the ring he was an inquisitive child with odd interests, who enjoyed causing mischief and solitary activities such as burrowing under trees to look at roots. He dislikes himself, stale raw fish, and “hobbitses.” Read More

NCBI ROFL: Parachute use to prevent death and major trauma related to gravitational challenge.

By ncbi rofl | February 16, 2010 7:00 pm

parachuteParachute use to prevent death and major trauma related to gravitational challenge: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

“OBJECTIVES: To determine whether parachutes are effective in preventing major trauma related to gravitational challenge. DESIGN: Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases; appropriate internet sites and citation lists. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL

NCBI ROFL: Depiction of elderly and disabled people on road traffic signs: international comparison.

By ncbi rofl | February 15, 2010 7:00 pm

332651213_a0ca6caa80“The traffic sign for elderly or disabled people crossing the road was introduced in the United Kingdom in 1981 after a children’s competition.  It portrays a silhouette of a man with a flexed posture using a cane and leading a kyphotic woman… The same sign is also used for frail, disabled, or blind people, even though many of these people are not old. The sign implies that osteopaenic vertebral collapse and the need for mobility aids are to be expected with physical disability as well as with advancing age. Elderly people should not be stigmatised as being impaired or inevitably disabled. We had observed that some countries did not depict these groups in this way and wondered how road signs worldwide illustrate elderly people, as well as people with physical disabilities… Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, NCBI ROFL

NCBI ROFL: I scream! You scream! We all scream…from ice-cream headaches.

By ncbi rofl | February 14, 2010 7:00 pm

2696591391_a11758a0e5

It’s BMJ week on NCBI ROFL!  Each day this week we will feature a fun article from a British Medical Journal holiday issue.  Enjoy!

Ice cream evoked headaches (ICE-H) study: randomised trial of accelerated versus cautious ice cream eating regimen

“Cold stimulus headache, also known as ice cream headache, is a common problem and is reported to occur in about a third of a randomly selected population. It was further suggested that the ice cream headache could be induced only in hot weather… we compared the effect of two ice cream eating regimens on the incidence of ice cream induced headaches in a prospective randomised manner. The study was carried out during the winter to test whether this phenomenon was restricted to hot weather only… Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: BMJ week, eat me, NCBI ROFL, rated G
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