Category: teh interwebs

NCBI ROFL: Where do you score on the Facebook Addiction Scale?

By ncbi rofl | July 16, 2012 7:00 pm

“The Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale (BFAS), initially a pool of 18 items, three reflecting each of the six core elements of addiction (salience, mood modification, tolerance, withdrawal, conflict, and relapse), was constructed and administered to 423 students together with several other standardized self-report scales (Addictive Tendencies Scale, Online Sociability Scale, Facebook Attitude Scale, NEO-FFI, BIS/BAS scales, and Sleep questions). Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, teh interwebs

NCBI ROFL: How your brain is like Google.

By ncbi rofl | April 26, 2012 7:00 pm

Google and the mind: predicting fluency with PageRank.

“Human memory and Internet search engines face a shared computational problem, needing to retrieve stored pieces of information in response to a query. We explored whether they employ similar solutions, testing whether we could predict human performance on a fluency task using PageRank, a component of the Google search engine. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, teh interwebs

NCBI ROFL: The effect of social support derived from World of Warcraft on negative psychological symptoms.

By ncbi rofl | April 16, 2012 7:00 pm

“Previous research examining players of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) suggests that players form meaningful relationships with each other. Other research indicates that people may derive social support from online sources, and this social support has been associated with greater well-being. This study used an online survey of players (N = 206) of the MMOG World of Warcraft (WoW) to examine if social support can be derived from MMOGs and to examine its relationship with negative psychological symptoms. Read More

NCBI ROFL: The real reason Nigerian princes use email instead of handwritten spam.

By ncbi rofl | March 27, 2012 7:00 pm

The finer points of lying online: e-mail versus pen and paper.

“The authors present 3 experimental studies that build on moral disengagement theory by exploring lying in online environments. Findings indicate that, when e-mail is compared with pen and paper communication media (both of which are equal in terms of media richness, as both are text only), people are more willing to lie when communicating via e-mail than via pen and paper and feel more justified in doing so. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, rated G, teh interwebs

NCBI ROFL: Scientific study exposes lying on online dating profiles.

By ncbi rofl | March 22, 2012 7:00 pm

Separating fact from fiction: an examination of deceptive self-presentation in online dating profiles.

“This study examines self-presentation in online dating profiles using a novel cross-validation technique for establishing accuracy. Eighty online daters rated the accuracy of their online self-presentation. Information about participants’ physical attributes was then collected (height, weight, and age) and compared with their online profile, revealing that deviations tended to be ubiquitous but small in magnitude. Read More

NCBI ROFL: The science of Facebook relationship status: It's complicated.

By ncbi rofl | February 3, 2012 6:28 pm

It’s Facebook week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring papers about everyone’s favorite social networking site. Enjoy!

“Are We Facebook Official?” Implications of Dating Partners’ Facebook Use and Profiles for Intimate Relationship Satisfaction.

“Extending previous research on positive and negative correlates of Facebook use for individuals’ outcomes, this study examined male and female dating partners’ (n=58 couples) Facebook use and portrayals of their intimate relationship on the Facebook profile. Confirming hypotheses from compatibility theories of mate selection, partners demonstrated similar Facebook intensity (e.g., usage, connection to Facebook), and were highly likely to portray their relationship on their Facebook profiles in similar ways (i.e., display partnered status and show their partner in profile picture). Read More

NCBI ROFL: The “no sh*t, Sherlock” award: Facebook edition.

By ncbi rofl | February 2, 2012 7:52 pm

It’s Facebook week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring papers about everyone’s favorite social networking site. Enjoy!

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus? Examining Gender Differences in Self-Presentation on Social Networking Sites.

“Psychological research on gender differences in self-presentation has already revealed that women place higher priority on creating a positive self-presentation, while men are less concerned about the image they present in face-to-face (ftf) communication. Nowadays, with the extensive use of new media, self-presentation is no longer so closely tied to ftf situations, but can also take place in the online world. Read More

NCBI ROFL: Who needs a doctor when you have Facebook?

By ncbi rofl | February 1, 2012 7:13 pm

It’s Facebook week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring papers about everyone’s favorite social networking site. Enjoy!

Laypersons can seek help from their Facebook friends regarding medical diagnosis

“INTRODUCTION:
In contrast to Internet search engines, social media on the Internet such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. reach a large number of people, who are ready to help answering questions. This type of information aggregation has been dubbed “crowdsourcing” i.e. outsourcing a task to a large group of people or community (a crowd) through an open call. Our aim was to explore whether laypersons via Facebook friends could crowd source their way to a medical diagnosis based on a brief medical history, posted as a status update on Facebook. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, teh interwebs

NCBI ROFL: Social networks lack useful content for incontinence.

By ncbi rofl | January 31, 2012 6:40 pm

It’s Facebook week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring papers about everyone’s favorite social networking site. Enjoy!

“OBJECTIVE: To assess the incontinence resources readily available for patients among social networks. Social networks allow users to connect with each other and share content and are a widely popular resource on the Internet. These sites attract millions of users; however, social media are underused in the healthcare industry. METHODS: A search for “incontinence” was performed on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube in September 2010. The first 30 results were reviewed for each. The results were evaluated as useful or not useful and additionally catalogued as healthcare professionals, commercial products, or complementary and alternative medicine resources. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, teh interwebs, WTF?

NCBI ROFL: Mirror, mirror on my Facebook wall: effects of exposure to Facebook on self-esteem.

By ncbi rofl | January 30, 2012 7:13 pm

It’s Facebook week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring papers about everyone’s favorite social networking site. Enjoy!

“Contrasting hypotheses were posed to test the effect of Facebook exposure on self-esteem. Objective Self-Awareness (OSA) from social psychology and the Hyperpersonal Model from computer-mediated communication were used to argue that Facebook would either diminish or enhance self-esteem respectively. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, teh interwebs
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