Category: those crazy canucks

NCBI ROFL: What's more boring than waiting in line? Watching a video of waiting in line.

By ncbi rofl | September 19, 2011 7:00 pm

The impact of mood on time perception, memorization, and acceptance of waiting.

“The effects of mood on two cognitive processes, memorization and time perception, were examined. Participants (N = 155) first watched videos that successfully manipulated their mood (happy or sad); then they watched a video simulating a waiting line. Read More

NCBI ROFL: Early to bed and early to rise: Does it matter?

By ncbi rofl | July 15, 2011 7:00 pm

It’s CMAJ week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring articles from the Canadian Medical Association Journal’s holiday issues. Enjoy!

Background: Controversy remains about whether early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise (the Ben Franklin hypothesis), or healthy, wealthy and dead (the James Thurber hypothesis).

Methods: As part of the Determinants of Myocardial Infarction Onset Study, we determined through personal interviews the bedtimes and wake times of 949 men admitted to hospital with acute myocardial infarction. Participants reported their educational attainment and zip code of residence, from which local median income was estimated. We followed participants for mortality for a mean of 3.7 years. We defined early-to-bed and early-to-rise respectively as a bedtime before 11 pm and wake time before 6:30 am. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, those crazy canucks

NCBI ROFL: The efficacy of stethoscope placement when not in use: traditional versus "cool".

By ncbi rofl | July 14, 2011 7:00 pm

Fig. 1: Traditional (left) and “cool” (right) placements of the stethoscope when not in use.

It’s CMAJ week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring articles from the Canadian Medical Association Journal’s holiday issues. Enjoy!

Objective: To determine whether the “cool” or circumcervical placement of the stethoscope when not in use is as efficacious as the traditional placement in terms of transfer time to the functional position.

Methods: Measurement of time taken by 100 health care professionals in each group to transfer stethoscope to functional position.
Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, those crazy canucks

NCBI ROFL: A novel method for the removal of ear cerumen.

By ncbi rofl | July 13, 2011 7:00 pm

It’s CMAJ week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring articles from the Canadian Medical Association Journal’s holiday issues. Enjoy!

“We describe the off-label use of a recreational device (the Super Soaker Max-D 5000) in the alleviation of a socially emergent ear condition.

A 45-year-old male complained of a profound reduction in his left ear acuity while staying at an island cottage in rural Ontario. His hearing loss was reducing his ability to hear his newborn son cry in the middle of the night, requiring his wife to carry out all late-night child care. As a result, correction of the problem was considered urgent.
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CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, those crazy canucks

NCBI ROFL: “Playboy Rabbit” sign: What's your diagnosis?

By ncbi rofl | July 12, 2011 7:00 pm

It’s CMAJ week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring articles from the Canadian Medical Association Journal’s holiday issues. Enjoy!

The Case: A 35-year-old, otherwise healthy woman arrived with complaints of shortness of breath and abdominal pain. Results of a physical examination, electro- and echocardiography, and chest radiography were all normal. An ultrasound scan of the liver was done (Fig. 1). What is your diagnosis?
Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: NCBI ROFL, those crazy canucks

NCBI ROFL: Room for dessert: an expanded anatomy of the stomach.

By ncbi rofl | July 11, 2011 7:00 pm

It’s CMAJ week on NCBI ROFL! All this week we’ll be featuring articles from the Canadian Medical Association Journal’s holiday issues. Enjoy!

“The presence of an accessory dessert pouch of the stomach has been postulated informally for years. These claims are often made near the end of a holiday feast, after the main course as thoughts turn to the pending arrival of pies, cakes, ice cream and pastries. A review of the medical literature, however, finds no mention of such a pouch. Indeed, the pouch has never been described in the anatomical record. Where, then, does dessert go, given that people often eat it after proclaiming themselves “full”? An alternative hypothesis suggests that dessert “fills in the cracks” between earlier courses. We developed the present study to address the hypothesis that an accessory pouch within, or attached to, the stomach provides the anatomic and physiologic requirements for dessert containment and absorption. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: eat me, NCBI ROFL, those crazy canucks
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