Daily Data Dump (Wednesday)

By Razib Khan | April 28, 2010 3:47 pm

Adaptation, Plasticity, and Extinction in a Changing Environment: Towards a Predictive Theory. It’s beneficial to have a little give.

Enculturation and Wall Street. Rich, irrational herds? I think you can’t ignore the Magnetar strategy either. What may be rational for a firm or individual may result in the shrinking of the aggregate pie.

Peppers May Increase Energy Expenditure in People Trying to Lose Weight. No wonder so many people who like bland food are fat.

Y chromosomes of Northwest China. No surprise if you’ve read Empires of the Silk Road.

Crossing the Wallace Line. Patterns across species.

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  • Sandgroper

    The peppers story doesn’t really help to explain why Mexico has such a problem with obesity. Maybe it’s all them refried beans.

    The thing I have always struggled to understand is why chillies in the diet seem far more entrenched in countries closer to the equator – with some exceptions, but as a trend, the c0untries where spicy food is the norm tend to be the hotter countries. I know the received wisdom about spices helping to prevent meat spoiling, but this story runs counter to that – raising the body temperature should be more attractive in cold climates.

    Not, I hasten to add, that I have anything against people eating spicy food, and certainly not our esteemed host, but I have never really felt that I understood the modern global distribution of it.

    In China, it’s weird – people in Sichuan Province make their food fiery hot, while in most of the rest of China, the food is really pretty bland. In the northeast, they go much more for garlic and spring onion than the hot stuff. Likewise Korea – land at Seoul airport, and the smell of garlic nearly knocks you over. I don’t mind, I love garlic, but it’s very noticeable. But then there’s kimchi, which is pretty hot – not for the Zeebster, but for mere mortals.

    No biggie, but it’s interesting. I’d welcome a comment from anyone who understands it.

  • Pingback: The Next Twenty Years » Blog Archive » Modeling the probabilities of extinction | Gene Expression()

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This blog is about evolution, genetics, genomics and their interstices. Please beware that comments are aggressively moderated. Uncivil or churlish comments will likely get you banned immediately, so make any contribution count!

About Razib Khan

I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. In relation to nationality I'm a American Northwesterner, in politics I'm a reactionary, and as for religion I have none (I'm an atheist). If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com

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