ScienceBlogs has good blogs

By Razib Khan | July 20, 2010 2:35 pm

I don’t have real value to add on the ScienceBlogs controversy. The only thing I want to mention is that there are some nascent superstar weblogs on that network which aren’t big names, yet, but perhaps will be. You can miss them coming in via the front page because they don’t crank out 10-15 posts per day, but they make them count when they do post. Two new weblogs which have caught my attention are Thoughtful Animals and Observations of a Nerd. There are others too if you poke around (your disciplinary focus may differ).

At this point I think for some people ScienceBlogs is not a the optimal venue. Obviously I was one of those people, as I left in late March. But for other people the reach of a prominent network still has utility. No need to throw the baby out with the bathwater. So by all means, let’s keep track of the SB Diaspora, but there are also diamonds in the rough who aren’t budging.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Blog
MORE ABOUT: ScienceBlogs
  • http://scienceblogs.com/thoughtfulanimal Jason G. Goldman

    Thanks, dude. Still not sure what my future is at Sb, but it will at least be a considered decision.

  • http://neuronculture.com David Dobbs

    valuable point nicely made, Razib. As a low-vol blogger I esp appreciate your urging ppl to look for those who produce fewer but high-value posts. (Not saying that’s me; just that it’s an important thing.) One problem with the SB (and other) pay-scale schemes that pay per pageview is it encourages, or at leaset rewards, lots of posts, and also tempts posts that titillate or excite or provoke rather than enrich a conversation. Some put out lots of stuff that’s high-quality, to be sure. But per-view pay encourages lots, and puts quality in back seat as long as the eyeballs come.

  • http://scienceblogs.com/terrasig Abel Pharmboy

    I am certain that you are speaking of me as well ;-)

    Right? Ummm…right?

    Well, even if not, I really have appreciated all of your support and kindness over the years. I am particularly sad for these newer folks for whom scoring a spot at SB was a much bigger deal than when I joined in 2006 and there were fewer to choose from. To stand out as a selection in 2010 is a much more prestigious recognition.

    But, yes, these are interesting times, to say the least.

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    abel, i was spotlighting very new blogs which i have a specific topical interest in, and which i could plausibly still have missed :-) obviously there are plenty of older blogs which i am familiar with. but poking around the links i still find new stuff/blogs of great interest or high quality.

    but yeah, mostly i feel really bad about the timing of this for some people. i say this as someone who left really recently, so but for the grace of god go i and all that….

  • http://scienceblogs.com/observations Christie

    Thanks Razib! I’m in the same boat as Jason. I’m a Scibling for now, but the future may change things… or not. Only time will tell :)

  • http://laughingmantis.com Daniel Brown

    I absolutely agree. I’ve been in love with the words that fly from Christie’s fingers since the first day I read them back before her move to Sb. And over the past couple of months, I have found Thoughtful Animals to be among my favorite blogs on the web.

  • http://whitecoatunderground.wordpress.com PalMD

    I completely agree

  • Pingback: Tweets that mention ScienceBlogs has good blogs | Gene Expression | Discover Magazine -- Topsy.com

  • http://scienceblogs.com/clock Coturnix

    I also completely agree. There are many science blogs now, and a nice proportion of them are really good, and Christie and Jason are tops. Even in these busy times I found time to read their posts every time because it is good stuff, worth my time.

  • http://www.yahoo.com jitender

    I know understand what are you saying? also completely agree. There are many science blogs now, and a nice proportion of them are really good, and Christie and Jason are tops. Even in these busy times I found time to read their posts every time because it is good stuff, worth my time.

  • http://www.yahoo.com nurul

    I absolutely agree.And over the past couple of months, I have found Thoughtful Animals to be among my favorite blogs on the web.

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    strange that two brown people post short comments in quick succession have their URL link be yahoo.com. does yahoo really need a pagerank boost? :-)

  • http://astuscience.wordpress.com/ Pablo Astudillo

    I agree with most of the comments, regarding the periodicity of posting in science blogs. Maybe it’s easy to have a blog with many daily entries, with no real discussion, or instead you can write a post per week and trying to add more than links or badges from researchblogging and other stuff.

    Nonetheless, having a post hosted in ScienceBlogs, or Discover, allows you to have an audience and getting feedback from your words, which is valuable. I know many outstanding blogs in platforms such as wordpress or blogspot, with no comments in the vast majority of the entries, even in very good posts.

    It’s really sad to make an effort to have an updated blog and having zero comments, dude.

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    It’s really sad to make an effort to have an updated blog and having zero comments, dude.

    i’ll take your word for it. wouldn’t know the feeling :-) (joking)

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    though if an obscure science blogger wants to get a link from me in a data dump or something, posting good stuff, commenting here with link, or linking to one of my posts so i see the link will get my attention. the most proactive thing i do now is check out researchblogging. obviously topicality matters.

  • http://astuscience.wordpress.com/ Pablo Astudillo

    If ypu think that my intention was that you said (posting a comment with a link and so on), you are wrong. The thing is I really hate the controversies about platforms and popularity. As you mentioned, many really good blogs have no comments at all, yet they are very informative and complete.
    Maybe ResearchBlogging is one way to get more visits (though the inherent bias in the readership, mostly from the academic world), but what happens of you don’t want to be into the researchblogging thing? You die.
    Nonetheless, this is old as the man itself. Many good books are forgotten, good songs, good music…

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    The thing is I really hate the controversies about platforms and popularity.

    yeah, true. gets old. hopefully we’ll get to a new equilibrium.

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Gene Expression

This blog is about evolution, genetics, genomics and their interstices. Please beware that comments are aggressively moderated. Uncivil or churlish comments will likely get you banned immediately, so make any contribution count!

About Razib Khan

I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. In relation to nationality I'm a American Northwesterner, in politics I'm a reactionary, and as for religion I have none (I'm an atheist). If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com

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