Religion determines politics for Asian Americans

By Razib Khan | November 11, 2012 2:38 pm

I was at ASHG this week, so I’ve followed reactions to the election passively. But one thing I’ve seen is repeated commentary on the fact that Asian Americans have swung toward the Democrats over the past generation. The thing that pisses me off is that there is a very obvious low-hanging fruit sort of explanation out there, and I’m frankly sick and tired of reading people ramble on without any awareness of this reality. We spent the past few months talking about the power of polls, and quant data vs. qual (bullshit) analysis, with some of my readers going into full on let’s-see-if-Razib-is-moron-enough-to-swallow-this-crap mode.

In short, it’s religion. Barry Kosmin has documented that between 1990 and 2010 Asian Americans have become far less Christian, on average. Meanwhile, the Republican party has become far more Christian in terms of its identity. Do you really require more than two sentences to infer from this what the outcome will be in terms of how Asian Americans will vote?

Below I took the data from Pew’s Religious Identification Survey in terms of how all Americans lean politically based on religion, and compared it to how Asian Americans lean based on religion.

 


All Americans Lean Rep/Rep Lean Dem/Dem No Lean
Evangelical Churches 50% 34% 16%
Mainline Churches 41% 43% 16%
Catholics 33% 48% 19%
Buddhists 18% 67% 15%
Hindus 13% 63% 24%
Unaffiliated 23% 55% 23%
Asian Americans
Evangelical Churches 56% 28% 16%
Mainline Churches 37% 44% 18%
Catholics 42% 41% 17%
Buddhists 27% 56% 17%
Hindus 9% 72% 19%
Unaffiliated 21% 63% 16%

Now compare the above to the breakdown of Asian American religiosity. Over half of Asian Americans are non-Christian. The track record of non-Christians voting for Republicans in today’s America is not good. In contrast, Asian American lean toward Republicans is fine, assuming that they are Christian (the Evangelical group above excludes historically black churches). Asian American Catholics are somewhat more Democrat than white non-Hispanic Catholics, but far less than Hispanic Catholics. But the issue is that Christians, aggregating the Evangelical, Mainline, and Catholic categories together, only make up ~40 percent of the Asian American population. In 1990 60 percent of Asian Americans were Christian. Today 30 percent follow non-Christian religions. In 1990 15 percent did.

These data may not explain all the variation between then and now (the two causal factors being the growing identification of the Republican party with Christianity, and the growing non-Christianity of Asian America), but they can explain most of the variation. In other words, if you want to present another model, show me the data. I don’t care about your opinion or intuition. Intuition is another word for private bullshit. There is social science out there that doesn’t require an esoteric regression model. It’s not even in the class of a non-obvious prediction. Rather, the description screams out at you. It’s aggravating that people can’t be bothered to find this stuff when they can be bothered to subject me to long ramblings and ruminations.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Data Analysis, Demographics
  • T

    I don’t see how anyone could disagree with this. To what factor(s) do you ascribe the change in religion?

    I’ve been looking at the data for the election along with some stuff from other blogs and it seems to be clear that the Republican party lost because it left a lot of white votes on the table, specifically working-class great lakes people, along with young middle-class conservatives and libertarians everywhere.

    In Albion’s Seed terms, I think that if the Republican party is to survive it needs to firmly grab the Quaker/midland vote In a contest between a Yankee party and a Southern party the Midlands are going to swing Yankee. In a contest between a Yankee party and a Midlands party the South is going to swing Midlands.

  • http://ironrailsironweights.wordpress.com Peter

    What accounts for the decline in Christianity among Asians? 60% to 42% in a little over 20 years is a rather steep decline.

  • Larry, Sah Francisco

    My guess is the main driver is immigration. 2nd or 3rd generation Asians are probably mainly Christian, later immigrants probably not.

  • Karl Zimmerman

    Peter –

    I’d presume the difference is in part due to radically different components of the Asian population.

    From 2000 to 2010, the growth of the Asian American population was 43%. However, the growth in the Indian American population was 70%. Although smaller groups, the Pakistani-American population grew by 133%, and the Bangladeshi-American population by 203%.

    In contrast, growth of the three traditionally more Christian groups was below the cross-Asian average. Vietnamese growth was 40%, Filipino 39%, and Korean only 33%.

    Basically, the Asian-American population is getting less East/Southeast Asian, and more South Asian. If the current population trends continue, there will even be more Indian-Americans than Chinese-Americans by the end of the decade.

  • http://theunsilencedscience.blogspot.com/ nooffensebut

    “if you want to present another model, show me the data.”

    Okay. From 1998 to 2011, Asian SAT participation rose from 67% (57% 1999 trough) to 109% (117% 2008 peak). That is a 63% jump in 13 years or a 105% increase from trough to peak in 9 years. (ACT participation rose from 22% to 41%, an 86% jump.) Numbers in excess of 100% probably represent foreign students, whom the Census does not count. However, those students, I would presume, will likely attend American universities, and many will naturalize. In those 13 years, Asian SAT scores improved such that their math subtest advantage over whites grew from 0.3 to 0.6 standard deviations, and this trend appears to apply equally to foreign Asian students and Asian-American students. Since psychologists widely regard the SAT as an IQ test, Asians worldwide have become much smarter and more educated during a short time frame. Intelligence and education correlate with atheism and liberal political beliefs. Thus, the facts are consistent with the view that both religious identity and liberal political persuasions are symptomatic of conformity to the values of baby-boomer academics, which fits an appreciation for admirable Confucian morals or a vile racist stereotype, depending upon one’s mood.

  • Riordan

    Maybe this one is so low hanging, its now rotting on the ground….

    Just noticed this from the Pew Survey you linked to:

    http://www.pewforum.org/uploadedImages/Topics/Demographics/chap6-3.png

    Even among the ostensibly strong Republican leaning Asian Protestant Evangelical group, the gap is striking for the preference of Bigger Govt, More Services. Other groups are even more biased towards that direction (almost 2 to 1 for Catholics, Buddhists). The big (and shocking!) exception seems to be Indian Americans (labeled as Hindu), which were the most evenly divided on that question despite being, as mentioned before, among the most stalwart of Dem voting Asians. (I had to rub my eyes a couple of times just to make sure I wasn’t seeing things! ) And of course, White Christians as a whole show the exact opposite tendency.

    Perhaps they simply have a much more different conception of government as a whole vs contemporary “anti-statist” Republican ideology, especially compared with the “slash and burn” Tea Party types in the past 2-3 years? Or something just isn’t getting translated well. And on the other hand, you have the Democratic party nationally and in blue states (where the vast majority of Asians live) constantly trumpeting how they’ll make govt work for you, that type of thing. It will be very surprising if this does not explain a significant part of the recent strong tilting towards the Dems by them.

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    re: de-christianization. yes, immigration #1 factor. but remember, in the same period the number of those with ‘no religion’ in the whole population doubled. wouldn’t be surprised if some of the japanese americans (for example) who were xtian in the past have children who are irreligious. even in 1990 asian american youth were very secular (kosmin noted this).

    #5, sure. but do you actually believe that’s persuasive? if you don’t, keep posting stuff like that. if you are just throwing that out there, don’t waste my time.

    #6, you need to read more about identity politics and american history. you take survey data way too seriously. remember, these are the moronic electorate who want the ‘government to say out of my medicare.’ indian americans are affluent, so they should be sympathetic to free enterprise. but they see in republicans an existential threat to their identity. no way they’ll vote with that party.

  • Riordan

    #7. Do you mean to imply that the survey is flawed in its design, or that the respondents are flawed in their responses or otherwise not indicative of their actual positions? Just to want have some clarifications on your objections to this particular results section.

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    or that the respondents are flawed in their responses or otherwise not indicative of their actual positions?

    there are no ‘actual positions.’ to a great extent these sentiments are vague and content-free. look at how people vote. not what they say (e.g., lots of blacks and hispanics espouse social conservatism, but always vote dem).

  • T

    “Since psychologists widely regard the SAT as an IQ test, Asians worldwide have become much smarter and more educated during a short time frame. ”

    Are you proposing that Asian IQs noticeably rose worldwide in 13 years? IQ is highly correlated with intelligence, and intelligence is highly heritable. The selection event that could produce a noticeable change worldwide in one generation would have had to have been newsworthy, on the order of a billion dead/sterilized. I suppose that you could be talking about some sort of Flynn effect, but that is more a limitation of testing than an actual change in intelligence. Thus one would not expect the effects to extend into non-testing areas. Thus SAT improvements related to a Flynn effect would not affect voting.

    I think that a more reasonable explanation is that continual adjustments to and the and renorming of the SAT has resulted in improved Asian performance. If the group as a whole is declining in quality while scores stay the same, then a subgroup that doesn’t decline in quality will see scores increase.

    So then we come back to religion. The religious changes would come from recent immigrants being less likely to be Christian, along with young people becoming atheists.

  • SD

    Who exactly are the Asian American Christians? The only Asian countries with substantial Christian populations are the Phillippines, South Korea and parts of China like Hong Kong. Most of the others would be Buddhist, Muslim or Hindu.

  • omar

    Religion captures a lot of it, probably most of it.
    Also, anecdotally, Asian-Americans in general tend to be cynical about ideology. I dont find a lot of Asians who buy the notion that Republicans have a strikingly different “free-market” ideology compared to Democrats. They both look like crony-capitalists, with somewhat different tribes being invited to join the crony pool. And it looks like the Democrats are OK with Hindus, Buddhists, whatever (even “moderate Muslims”) joining the party, while Republicans look too White, too Christian and too full of Rush Limbaugh type bullcrap.
    I am not saying Asian-Americans are right to be so cynical, just that they frequently are.
    Just anecdotally, I know several Asian doctors who voted Republican..but only and only for the sake of their own tax rate/expectation of cut in govt funds directed towards certain private practice doctors by Obama. The rest of the propaganda of freedom, liberty, enterprise and guns didnt register one bit. In short, if part of the game is “marketing”, then the Republicans main marketing pitch seemed directed at someone else. Republicans were not so subtly advertising that their circle is really meant for Christian-White-Confederacy types. That probably matters.

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #11, click the links and you will see who they are.

  • Karl Zimmerman

    A few secondary thoughts.

    1. I agree with Razib that I think within certain cohorts the second generation leaning more secular probably plays a major role. I would expect that for Korean Christians this plays the biggest role, because their children are most likely to end up integrated into upper-middle class secular white culture, which would tend to both secularize and liberalize them. In contrast, Filipinos and Vietnamese tend to be a bit more lower-middle class in the U.S., so to the extent they acculturate it can be into whatever the local lower-middle class white culture is, which could either be secular/liberal or conservative/christian depending upon the area.

    2. I wonder if by 2020 we’ll see the census formally distinguish between South Asians and East Asians? Historically we haven’t had to because South Asians have been such a small group, but clearly that’s rapidly changing.

    3. I am curious to see what will happen in the next decade with the large Asian communities which have sprung up around Houston and Atlanta. Will Asian Americans there acculturate into the dominant Asian-American norm of Democratic-identification, or acculturate into the white suburban norm for the region of conservative Republicanism? A lot of Democrats take the former as a given (as it was what happened in Los Angeles, eventually), but it’s unclear to me that we should take from this a universal model.

  • Richard

    Here’s a basic question. What the hell is an ‘Asian American’?

    At first it was east Asians, then south Asians, now I even see Persians, Arabs etc. included. If so, then why not east-Ural white Russians?

  • Richard

    #14 said “In contrast, Filipinos and Vietnamese tend to be a bit more lower-middle class in the U.S.”

    I don’t think so. see http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/06/19/the-rise-of-asian-americans/

    Both groups make more than U.S. median household income.

    I also recommend the pew study as a good complement to Razib’s blog entry, i.e. great info about intermarriage rates, hierarchy of self-identification, and such.

  • http://theunsilencedscience.blogspot.com/ nooffensebut

    “Are you proposing that Asian IQs noticeably rose worldwide in 13 years?”

    Indeed, Asian SAT-takers in the US and abroad have experienced rapid, recent score improvement. However, this is not a closed population, participation rates confound in myriad ways, the College Board did not design the SAT to be an IQ test, the g-loading of the SAT is not 100%, and the heritability of IQ is not 100%. African Americans also experienced score improvement in the 70’s and 80’s.

    “I suppose that you could be talking about some sort of Flynn effect”

    Ironically, Razib Khan’s boss, Ron Unz, recently used my work to argue that Hispanic Americans experienced a “super-Flynn effect” because their SAT gap with whites only increased slightly while their participation rose, (which he grossly exaggerated).

    “I think that a more reasonable explanation is that continual adjustments to and the and renorming of the SAT has resulted in improved Asian performance.”

    No, Cohen’s d minimizes those effects, and the College Board explicitly designed its “recentering” partly to make Asians “appear less above average.”

    “Thus SAT improvements related to a Flynn effect would not affect voting.”

    It has been hypothesized that SAT improvements affect education exposure. Then again, facts are things that waste time.

  • Yong

    Re: Second generation Asian Americans’ religion

    In my case, I was raised Christian by Korean immigrant parents, but I am an atheist. I’m not affiliated with any party but I would tend towards Democratic. For instance, there’s no way I could have voted for Romney. Give me a better Republican candidate and there could be a chance I’d vote for that person.

    I can’t think of any Asian Americans I know who were raised non-Christian and became Christian because of American influence. I’d say an East Asian or Southeast Asian immigrant is more likely to be Christian than their American-bred children, but I have no statistics to back that up.

  • http://dispatchesfromturtleisland.blogspot.com ohwilleke

    From a point of methodology, I would argue that ethnography can be valuable data in addition to survey data, even though the sample sizes are much smaller. It is more than intuition.

    And, in that regard, I know perhaps a dozen first generation Korean Christians who would be fairly characterized as Evangelical Christian, and quite a few more of their second generation children. I’ve seen both phenomena in action.

    The first generation Korean Christians that I know have grown increasingly less comfortable with the Republican party despite their strong conservative values and Evangelical leanings – they are less welcome in the party and are concerned that the GOP does not have their overall best interests at heart. Also fervant anticommunism, which was a pretty important thread in their reasons for being Republicans when younger as a generation influenced by the Korean War, has grown to be a less salient issue.

    It is also true that their children are on average less likely to be Evangelical Christians although a significant number of them have gone on to join the Evangelical Christian clergy.

    Maybe my ethnographic exposure is atypical, or it might reflect acclimatization over decades of living in the U.S. while younger first generation Korean Christians are just as fervantly Republican as they once were when they were younger. But there are reality based reasons for thinking that both effects are present and the virtue of ethnographic level data relative to surveys, is that they can provide more reliable information about the subjective “whys” behind the trend.

  • http://ironrailsironweights.wordpress.com Peter

    In contrast, Filipinos and Vietnamese tend to be a bit more lower-middle class in the U.S., so to the extent they acculturate it can be into whatever the local lower-middle class white culture is, which could either be secular/liberal or conservative/christian depending upon the area.

    Do they ever blend into the local black culture?

  • I_Affe

    Peter,

    Anecdotally, growing up I saw a fair amount of Hmong mingling with African-Americans and black culture to an extent, e.g. music, fashion, slang, and gang membership (not in black gangs IIRC, but forming their own). However, the majority of Asian Americans were either quite fobby or more in tune with the local white culture.

  • Karl Zimmerman

    16 –

    Vietnamese are definitely well below the norm for Asian-American groups in the study you linked in terms of both income and education, although admittedly it doesn’t seem like it’s the case for Filipinos. I will freely admit my own experience is somewhat secondhand, as comparably few Filipinos are to be found on the east coast, but the ones I have known have tended to go into practical lines of work (small business owners, nurses, medical techs, etc), and not heavily into engineering, medicine, and other advanced degree programs as Chinese-Americans, Korean-Americans, and Indian-Americans. But since I’m speaking from anecdote I’ll just shut the hell up now.

    18 –

    Presumably the high level of Christians in the Japanese-American community is result of conversion, as most Japanese-Americans are native born, and few Japanese are Christians. The conversion may have happened one or two generations in the past however, and be receding in terms of salience. Either way, the Japanese-American community is dying out, due to few new Japanese migrating, and an extremely high intermarriage rate.

  • http://shinbounomatsuri.wordpress.com Spike Gomes

    Peter:

    Fil-Ams tend to mix with Hispanics quite easily, especially in California. Not too surprising, considering the shared Catholicism and Spanish cultural influences.

    In Hawaii and parts of the West Coast, there’s a sort of unified “lower middle-class” pan-Asian America (at least East and SE Asian American) urban youth culture forming. It’s partially informed by black culture, particularly the music and clothes, but quite unique in it’s own way, with it’s souped up and customized cars and motorcycles, illegal road racing, tech bling, pan-Asian random pastiche aesthetic and b-boy dance-offs. I have far too many cousins who are into that lifestyle.

  • Karl Zimmerman

    23 –

    I considered bringing up the “ricer” phenomena, but decided it was a bit off topic. =)

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #16, I also recommend the pew study as a good complement to Razib’s blog entry, i.e. great info about intermarriage rates, hierarchy of self-identification, and such.

    yep. i don’t provide links for nothin’ ;-)

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #17, Razib Khan’s boss, Ron Unz

    dude, i’m not an unz foundation fellow anymore (that’s why i took it down), so you might say “ex-boss.” though the reality is that i’ve had a different job for a long time now, even if i don’t enlighten you about. please don’t assume you know a lot about someone’s background when you don’t (the please is rhetorical, don’t pull that bullshit again; unless you are a good actor you have a lot of social retardation, so i figure i need to be explicit).

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    I can’t think of any Asian Americans I know who were raised non-Christian and became Christian because of American influence. I’d say an East Asian or Southeast Asian immigrant is more likely to be Christian than their American-bred children, but I have no statistics to back that up.

    want to take a bet on this? (money)

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    Presumably the high level of Christians in the Japanese-American community is result of conversion, as most Japanese-Americans are native born, and few Japanese are Christians.

    considering how old this community is, what’s surprising is the very low level of conversion to christianity! in any case, i think that yes, secularization is kicking in for 3rd and 4th generation japanese and chinese americans. they come from societies where institutional religion was weak in the first place, allowing them to become xtian to assimilate, but now that that’s not necessary, they seem to be shedding it.

  • Yong

    27

    No, I’m sure I’m biased. The more I thought about this topic yesterday, the more I realized that most of the Korean Americans I went to church with are still religious. So, I’m probably a little atypical, and I wasn’t looking outwardly enough when I posted before. I do recall a number of Koreans who became Christian after coming to America because they were integrating into an American community of Koreans who were churchgoers. And I recently read a NYTimes article about Chinese in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn who were becoming Christians and attending a Chinese American church. I think a lot of these immigrants become Christian to fit in with their compatriots, which is kind of strange if you think about it. They’re not being converted, usually, by white Americans but people from their own communities. They’re doing it to fit into a somewhat segregated ethnic enclave of Christians in America whose church services are usually in another language. But the group itself is doing it to be more American? I’m not sure.

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #29, it fits in with the ethnography with how ppl convert to a religion actually. ‘standard model.’ east asians (and southeast asian highlanders) have weak if any attachment to organized religions before they come to the USA. so naturally they become xtian to ‘fit in.’ in contrast, in thailand they become theravada buddhist. the main chasm seems to be islam, where dietary and cultural changes are such that one loses han identity (and becomes hui) if one converts.

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    in contrast, hindu and sikh south asians are like jews. they may not be very pious in their practice or belief (surveys indicate they’re not), but they have a very strong ethno-religious identity. so they tend not to ‘defect’ from that identity. a large number of xtian indians in the USA aren’t ppl who’ve converted, but ppl from indian xtian backgrounds, who are more likely to be migrants (e.g., from kerala).

  • Richard

    Razib said “in contrast, hindu and sikh south asians are like jews. they may not be very pious in their practice or belief (surveys indicate they’re not), but they have a very strong ethno-religious identity”

    Yes, as a man you has fallen in love with his share of smoking hot north Indian sikh women, I can testify this is, alas, all too true. :(

  • Karl Zimmerman

    Razib –

    What do you mean by “Southeast Asian highlanders?” Hmong? Shan? Karen?

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #33, shan are staunch buddhists. i mean mostly hmong. but karen would be grouped into this. as you may know in mainland southeast asia there is a large distinction between lowlanders, who are part of a broader theravada buddhist civilization (except vietnam), and highlanders, who are not necessarily (some highlanders obviously are, e.g., the shan). many highland populations have adopted christianity as a way to prevent further assimilation into lowland buddhist culture, in the nations of origin themselves (e.g., montagnards).

  • SeekTruthFromFacts

    #11: Wouldn’t Christians also be disproportionately likely to immigrate from East Asia to the US? I read a study by Yuan Yichuan* noting that Hmong students in SW China had disproportionate academic success (controlling for income and development exacerbated the anomaly). He attributed this to the fact that there are many Hmong Christians who are highly motivated by the possibility of joining the Hmong community in the US.

    Yuan Yichuan, ‘Attitude and Motivation for English Learning of Ethnic Minority Students in China’ (Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press 2007).

  • sandgroper

    #22 – there are problems with recognition of Filipino degrees. If they can make it to somewhere like AIT in Bangkok to do a ‘top up’ masters, then the engineering graduates can get the combined bachelors + masters recognised for professional qualification purposes. If not, they end up working as technicians.

    Same with a lot of East European degrees. I knew a lot of Estonians, Latvians, Hungarians working as engineering lab technicians who would have been qualified engineers in their own countries. I even knew a German guy who was driving a road grader.

  • Scott

    The fact that evangelicals overwhelmingly voted for a Mormon shows that political ideology was more important than religious ideology. There’s no reason to think that this wouldn’t extend to Asians.

  • Ed

    I’d say religion is a determining factor for sure. Practicing Christians in general are prone to being more socially conservative and vote that way too.

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #37, read the comments and links. ideology is a *weak* predictor (e.g., indian americans seem more skeptical of the democrat position gov., but vote most democratic). the best thing to do when adding a comment is not to add more crap to the stream that we’re trying to filter out for nice tidbits.

  • Karl Zimmerman

    Razib –

    I was a bit perplexed by your original wording, because it seemed to imply that highland Southeast Asians converted to Christianity in disproportionate numbers when they come to the U.S. AFAIK, the Hmong are the only highland group which has come to the U.S., and while some are Christian, I’m not sure there’s enough of them (or any other group worth speaking of) to talk about a trend within America.

    As to Asia, absolutely. Admittedly, I’m more familiar with the Christianized groups in Northeast India (Nagas, Mizos), than those in Burma or elsewhere, but it seems the same general trends are evident.

    Perhaps Theravada Buddhism developed its comparably strong identity because it was working over a fairly regularized Hindu substrate, whereas in East Asia each of the philosophies and religions (Taoism, Shintoism, local interpretations of Buddhism, etc) was essentially a warmed-over patina on top of inconsistent animist theology?

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    I’m not sure there’s enough of them (or any other group worth speaking of) to talk about a trend within America.

    i’m pretty sure they’re converting in large numbers. churches brought them over, and i have known of a fair number of hmong. they’re not 90% xtian, but large numbers did convert to protestant churches.

    Perhaps Theravada Buddhism developed its comparably strong identity because it was working over a fairly regularized Hindu substrate,

    no, it’s highly animist. interestingly most of the thai groups (in which the shan are bracketed) actually were mahayana when they arrived. the mon and khmer converted them.

  • Cal

    I didn’t see a response post to the bets you made on your “Skewing my winnings” post. In particular, this one was very interesting:
    ————————————————————–
    Daniel Gonzalez Buitrago Says:
    October 1st, 2012 at 9:54 am
    I´d like to participate in your bet Razib. I´ll bet 40 USD on the following:
    – The latest poll by Pew research before the election will overestimate Obama´s share of the national vote by at least 2%. (20 USD)
    – The latest poll by “We ask america” in Wisconsin will overestimate Obama´s share of the vote by an amount greater than its margin of error. (20 USD)
    ————————————————————–
    Daniel would’ve lost very badly, he ended up choosing two polls that performed exceptionally well!

    Last Pew poll: Obama 50%, Romney 47%
    Actual results: Obama 50.6%, Romney 47.8%
    http://www.people-press.org/2012/11/04/obama-gains-edge-in-campaigns-final-days/

    Last “We ask america” WI poll: Obama 51.5%, Romney 44.8% MOE 3%
    Actual results in WI: Obama 52.8%, Romney 46.1%
    Interestingly, this poll got the difference between the candidates exactly correct at 6.7%!
    http://weaskamerica.com/2012/11/02/hot-off-the-presses-2/

  • https://plus.google.com/109962494182694679780/posts Razib Khan

    #42, everyone paid up. please post stuff like that to the open thread.

  • http://www.isteve.blogspot Steve Sailer

    The Republicans ran a Mormon and a Catholic this time (i.e., no Protestants on the GOP national ticket for the first time ever), and they went extremely light on the Jesus talk in favor of the tax talk.

    Romney and Ryan’s share of the Jewish vote went up considerably, in both the Edison and Reuters-Ipsos exit polls.

    I suspect the Edison exit poll showing of a huge falloff since 2008 in Asians voting Republican was partly real, partly just an error due to small sample size. Unfortunately, the Reuters poll doesn’t break out Asians separately, but there are catch-all “Other Minorities” bin doesn’t jibe with a huge fall in Asians voting Republicans. Down some, but not a collapse like in the more publicized Edison exit poll.

  • Anthony

    So to look at the other side of the question at #11, who are the non-Asian-American Hindus?

    The differences in political leanings between “all Hindus” and “Asian-American Hindus” implies that there are at least some. Or is the survey(s?) just that noisy?

  • http://www.isteve.blogspot Steve Sailer

    Spike says:

    “In Hawaii and parts of the West Coast, there’s a sort of unified “lower middle-class” pan-Asian America (at least East and SE Asian American) urban youth culture forming. It’s partially informed by black culture, particularly the music and clothes, but quite unique in it’s own way, with it’s souped up and customized cars and motorcycles, illegal road racing, tech bling, pan-Asian random pastiche aesthetic and b-boy dance-offs. I have far too many cousins who are into that lifestyle.”

    Very interesting. I’ve gotten a few glimpses of this myself in Torrance, CA. I’d like to hear more.

  • http://delicious.com/robertford Darkseid

    Steve, this is their leader ;) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALphNDobVbo
    and this is one of the funnier ones going around:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uKiJdDkQ70 neither of them are b-boys tho. there are a lot of asian b-boy dance crews that do the competitions and stuff. the “asian b-boy crewz” tend to be a passive version of black cliques IMO, where they go through all the actions and buy the fast Hondas to race but don’t shoot each other.

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This blog is about evolution, genetics, genomics and their interstices. Please beware that comments are aggressively moderated. Uncivil or churlish comments will likely get you banned immediately, so make any contribution count!

About Razib Khan

I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. In relation to nationality I'm a American Northwesterner, in politics I'm a reactionary, and as for religion I have none (I'm an atheist). If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com

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Edifying books

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